Orpington colours

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by davy123, Oct 5, 2016.

  1. davy123

    davy123 Just Hatched

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    Hi everyone i am new onto BYC. I have a chocolate orpington hen and rooster but i have just bought silver laced hatching eggs and was wondering what colour chickens i would get if i was to use me chocolate rooster on the silver laced hens. Thanks
     
  2. davy123

    davy123 Just Hatched

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  3. bramblefir

    bramblefir Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You would get chocolate pullets and black cockerels.
     
  4. davy123

    davy123 Just Hatched

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    Thanks for the reply. What color would i get if i used the chocolate roaster on buff hens
     
  5. Wappoke

    Wappoke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The offspring colors depend on if the rooster carries sex-linked gold or sex-linked silver. The female offspring will be chocolate with non-chocolate (white or buff) on the breast, head and neck hackles- the buff or white may extend onto the back. The males will be black with some blotchy non-black (silver or buff) on the breast, The non-black could be a small amount or the entire breast could be silver or buff. Some chickens carry modifiers that cause the entire breast to be non-black.

    The male chicks from the cross will carry one gene for chocolate and can produce some females that are chocolate.
     
  6. davy123

    davy123 Just Hatched

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    Would I loose quality of chocolate color using my choc rooster on the silver laced hens
     
  7. Wappoke

    Wappoke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    what do you mean by quality of color? do you want to produce birds that are solid chocolate? The genetics that produce a chicken of a specific color can be complicated. Most of the time if a chicken does not have a full complement of certain genes, the desired plumage color will be lacking. The greatest percentage of time if you cross two birds that are genetically different, the epistatic plumage color ( chocolate in your case) will not be replete. Some other color; white, red, buff will show up in the plumage.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
  8. davy123

    davy123 Just Hatched

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    yeah i really like the color of my choc rooster and was just wondering would the chicks from him be the same color if i used him on silver laced hens or would they be choc with a watered down look to them. I suppose i could get choc hens and not worry about using the silver laced hens but i like them and think they would be nice walking around my yard.
     
  9. Wappoke

    Wappoke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There will not be any dilution (watered down) of the plumage colors. The male offspring will be black with some white feathers in their plumage, most likely the white will be on the breast and in the neck hackles. The females will be chocolate with some white or red feathers in the hackles. Some non-chocolate color ( red or white) may show on the breast- if it does it will be a small amount.

    The only way you could dilute the colors would be to introduce a blue allele or two lavender alleles into a future generation.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
  10. bk15

    bk15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well if u breed correctly you could get chocolate sliver laced Orphington's just google that color and u can see pictures the color was created this year!!! And it's beautiful[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     

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