our own ducklings??

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by chilly, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. chilly

    chilly Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 21, 2009
    England
    We are quite positive now that we have 2 females and 1 male.

    When they start to lay, would they be able to incubate and rear young themselves and what do we need to look for or do (or not do)

    sorry if this is a bit vague but we have only just thought about the positbility of having our own ducklings
     
  2. maplesky7

    maplesky7 Flock Mistress

    Jun 14, 2008
    N. IL.
    I think some breeds may be broodier than others...just like chickens.

    I'm new to ducks as well. But as far as I have gathered it seems ducks like to hide their eggs and it seems they are perfect mothers.

    So good luck to you. I hope it is a success.

    You can also do a search in the search engine and see if you can't find anything else while you wait for more responses regarding duck breeding...
     
  3. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    What sort of ducks do you have?
     
  4. Goat_Walker

    Goat_Walker I Am THE Crazy Duck Lady

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    Jul 9, 2008
    Maryland
    Yes , what breed of duck? Buffs and magpies and scovies are great moms, where as runners, rouens and pekins Ive heard wont hatch their own.
     
  5. chickensducks&agoose

    chickensducks&agoose Chillin' With My Peeps

    Swedish do well as mommies too. The daddies are all involved too.
     
  6. chilly

    chilly Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 21, 2009
    England
    Thanks for the responses so far,

    we are sure our Aylesbury and swede are females and the Khaki is a drake (we think)

    could someone define "broody" for me [​IMG]
     
  7. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Broody=Hormonal [​IMG] .... but true!
    The broody hen (duck or chook) will set on her nest desiring to hatch out a clutch of ducklings/peeps. She will hiss, bite & whine at any and all who get too close to her and her nest. If a chook, she will puff up her feathers. She will only get off her nest once a day and sometimes less often to grab a quick meal and poo, so as to both protect and keep her eggs warmed/incubated at the right temps, all the while puffing up her feathers and screaming at anyone near her. So the saying , "Mad as a broody hen!" [​IMG]
    I have a lot of broodies. [​IMG] both chooks and Scovy.
    I love watching the new babies w/their moms but just realize that the moms will not want you to touch or get near those sweet things & will get all bent out of shape when you do. They do mellow out after a few weeks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  8. Bring

    Bring Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2009
    New Mexico
    quick question or two or three:
    Are cayugas good mothers?? Will they go broody? I have chickens so I guess I could sneek some eggs under a broody chicken. I heard that if you slip chicken eggs under a duck that when they hatch the mother will lead the chicks to water and they will drown. Is that true??
     
  9. chilly

    chilly Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 21, 2009
    England
    Thanks Keeper, that has made things a lot clearer. Would the ducks hatch the eggs themselves, regarless of the time of year or is it better to only let them hatch in the warmer months?
     
  10. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Are cayugas good mothers?? Will they go broody?

    Hopefully someone with experience with cayugas will answer you.

    I heard that if you slip chicken eggs under a duck that when they hatch the mother will lead the chicks to water and they will drown. Is that true??

    I've read that has happened. The chicks wouldn't know to stay out of the water whereas it would be natural for the momma duck to take them in. Doesn't seem to be a problem the other way around ie. Chook hatching ducklings. You'd probably either need to take them away once hatched and brood them yourself or only provide a very shallow pan of water or a regular chicken waterer.

    Chilly, I think it would depend on the breed of duck whether or not she would set and hatch out a clutch. I don't expect my Scovies to brood in winter. We get really cold snowy weather here and winter is already hard enough on the adults. If a peep or duckling did somehow get separated fm the momma duck for some reason, they might die fm the cold unless another heat source was provided.​
     

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