1. Twister-n-Dos

    Twister-n-Dos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2012
    Alaska
    Our 7 month old pullet has a comb that is becoming increasingly pale. I don't know if what we are seeing is normal or not. The comb on our six month old pullet is remaining red. Here are two pictures of the bird in question.

    7 months old:
    [​IMG]


    and 4 months old:
    [​IMG]

    She does not show any signs of ill health like lethargy, failing to eat, etc. Is there any cause for concern?
     
  2. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    A pale comb is often among the symptoms of various diseases 'n such, but not w/o additional issues ... it'd be a good idea to read over the Diagnosing Dieseases Based Upon Symptoms link below, as it often helps folks to spot things they'd previously overlooked.

    Also, add Apple Cider Vinegar to their water (but not in galvanized containers) for all of your birds, at the rate of four teaspoons to the gallon (the target pH is 5~6, or slightly acidic). The tannin in ACV helps to 'cut through' the mucus and coating w/in the mouth, throat and intestines, which improves the uptake of nutrients/vitamins, and also helps them to expel the excess and toxins from their systems, and boost their immune systems. It also create an environment hostile for internal parasites, and is used to treat exposures to the toxins botulism forms, and algae poisoning.

    For certain, this will do no harm to your birds, under any circumstances I've ever encountered ...

    Although I've documented my every claim for the above benefits, I've none to offer for my personal manner of phasing it in and out in a cycle of every three days or so, by increasing and decreasing the concentration. But, initially, you could add two teaspoons to the gallon, followed by three teaspoons to the gallon, and then four ... you get the idea. Most folks just give it continuously, but my theory is that my method allows the birds to more naturally adjust to their environments, and all the benefits I'm lookin' for are accomplished w/in those three days (which are repeated often enough to continue the benefit ~'-)
     
  3. Twister-n-Dos

    Twister-n-Dos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2012
    Alaska
    Thanks for the thoughtful reply crowcreekgeek. I will study the link you directed me to. I am going to have to see if a plastic water container will work with the water warmer I have rigged up. It is -15F this morning, calling for -25F tonight.
     
  4. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    Didn't see that it was so very cold ... there is a good chance the paleness is due to frostbite -- they often turn much lighter shade before blackening (usually in patches and on the tips).
     
  5. Twister-n-Dos

    Twister-n-Dos Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2012
    Alaska
    They are not outside in these temps. They have a well ventilated insulated coop that is staying about 20 to 25 degrees warmer than the outside temperature. We have a male bird that has a huge single comb. He is showing some signs of frostbite on the tips of his comb. This does not look like that. We are also down to about 6 hours of daylight now. We have a light on a timer for about 13 hours a day. Maybe this is just a normal wintertime response?
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    Sounds very likely, as I've noticed some of my own chickens seem to lose a bit of color if they're dehydrated, and shortly after sunset -- temperature drops suddenly, and the humidity usually goes way up w/in a very short time.
     

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