Pearling/partial-pearling/non-pearling?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by rollyard, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. rollyard

    rollyard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Has anyone any ideas/thoughts about pearling/semi pearling/non-pearling? I am not too sure that factor/s involved which effect the degree of pearling are well understood. It has been thought in the past that two doses of an autosomal recessive (m/m) would produce non-pearled birds, heterozygous M+/m would produce partially-pearled birds, & two doses of M+/M+ would produce fully pearled birds. However, in some places it is my understanding that only fully & semi pearled birds exist, ie, no completely non-pearled birds @ all. This would tend to indicate that another/other factor/s (that which removes, or helps to remove all pearling) doesn't exist in those places, otherwise, any birds pure m/m produced would be non-pearled.
     
  2. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not me, but I wish I knew...and I also wish I could relate to/understand genetics in the terms you use, lol but I can't. Way way over my head! I can wrap my brain around the dominant and recessive genes/colors/pearling, but that's as far as I get before confusion sets in, lol.

    I until 2011 I've only had pearled and partially-pearled birds in my flocks, for years... then all of a sudden without bringing in any new blood.genes I am now up to 3 non-pearled birds. Luckily one is a Hen!

    Sorry I am no help with this...
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  3. rollyard

    rollyard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Peeps

    We are all learning. Unfortunately, most of us don't know enough to know it all, or even very much [​IMG]

    It is strange that for years you have only bred the fully & partially pearled birds though. Perhaps something, or combination, that has/have come together in correct formula in those three birds which removes last vestiges of pearling?

    It would be interesting to mate one of these non-pearled birds to one that is fully pearled in first instance, then interbreed progeny bred in the second?

    PS.....Just had a thought.....it would be interesting also to mate two of your non-pearled birds together. What could you expect from such a mating do you think, & what would outcome tell us?
     
  4. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Offspring hatched from a non-pearled and fully-pearled (or partially-pealed) pairing will most likely produce all fully-pearled (or partially-pealed) keets, because of the non-pearled gene being completely recessive... but any of those keets bred back to the non-pearled parent, (or 2 of the offspring paired up) should produce some non-pearled keets in the hatches (the recessive non-pearled gene should pair up in some of the keets, but not likely all of the keets since the more dominant pearling genes are still swimming around n the gene pool).

    Altho I am not a huge fan of the non-pearled variety (except my pure Whites), I do plan to pen up one of my non-pearled males with my non-pearled Hen sometime this season, and incubate their eggs to see what I get from them. Since all of the keets will be getting a copy of the non-pearled gene from each parent, I am hoping the hatches will consist of just non-pearled keets... but since all of the birds in my flocks are so diversely genetically mixed (and I have no idea exactly who is carrying the hidden recessive non-pearled gene) I am assuming that there will also be some fully-pearled and/or partially-pearled keets in the hatches as well. I'd love it if I got all non-pearled keets from the hatches for my first attempt, but I doubt it's likely in my situation since I am not dealing with purebred non-pearled birds. I expect that it may take me more than 1 or 2 breeding seasons to get completely non-pearled hatches. We shall see tho.

    I won't be able to set up my breeding pens until later this Spring once the torrential downpours that we get here are done and gone for the season, but it's definitely on the project list... plus I need to sell a few batches of keets from my main breeding flocks first to finance the building supplies, lol.
     
  5. rollyard

    rollyard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    According to “older” theory, M+ is incompletely dominant over m allele, so M+/M+ birds are fully pearled, M+/m birds are partially pearled, & m/m birds are non-pearled. However, these outcomes are not supported in some populations when you consider that no non-pearled birds occur. Let us look @ an example; we breed a bird genetically M+/m (partially-pearled) to a bird genetically M+/m (partially-pearled). Approximately 25% (1 in 4) keets bred should be genetically m/m (non-pearled)! This isn’t happening though is it in some instances? Non-pearled x partially pearled should produce approx. 50% non-pearled progeny, according to above theory. Hence the reason it is likely that something else involved.

    If all factors involved in producing non-pearled birds are recessive (Z-linked or autosomal), then breeding two non-pearled birds together should produce all non-pearled progeny. If M+ completely dominant over m, then birds genetically M+/M+ & M+/m should/could be completely pearled, while those genetically m/m could be partially pearled? Now something else is required to “clean up the mess” so to speak, ie, remove last vestiges of pearling?

     
  6. JLeigh

    JLeigh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Peeps and Rollyard - I'm starting to get it, but it's taking a lot of my brain power. [​IMG]
     

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