peeping in the shell??

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by horseyjess, Apr 14, 2011.

  1. horseyjess

    horseyjess Chillin' With My Peeps

    370
    1
    129
    Sep 2, 2009
    SW Florida
    Ok I am getting pretty good at this chick hatching thing. My problem is with a goose egg. I had 5 4 made stink bombs and this one is on day 29 now. It has been rocking and chirping in the shell all day. I have been incubating it with chicken humidity and only wet a few days as I would forget. So i am afraid that I may have done something wrong and make it stuck in there. How long can it rock and complain in shell before I need to worry?
     
  2. ScissorChick

    ScissorChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2010
    Under Your bed
    With all honastly, I don't know anything about geese eggs.

    However, if you have been opening the incubator, and if the

    little guy has made a pip, he could get shrink wrapped and stuck. I've made

    that mistake. If he has not made a hole in the egg yet, don't worry about that.

    My eggs start chirping about 24 hours before trying to crack the egg. So it's

    normal, and I think your little one will be fine. [​IMG]

    ~Scissor
     
  3. horseyjess

    horseyjess Chillin' With My Peeps

    370
    1
    129
    Sep 2, 2009
    SW Florida
    No opening I have learned the hard way you can put your ear to the bator and hear it.. Nobody else is anywhere near hatching right now...I just havent done the goose egg thing and am worried that cause I didnt wet the egg enough that the shell might be to tough!
     
  4. KlaHaYa Gardens

    KlaHaYa Gardens Chillin' With My Peeps

    690
    3
    123
    Apr 14, 2011
    On Day 29 I doubt you have anything to worry about. The rocking and singing is a good sign. I've had goose eggs hatch on day 32 and 33. I hold a flash light up to the egg (without lifting or moving the egg) to verify life. The light will either show the living, moving bird OR will wake it up.

    You want your bird to be strong enough to hatch on it's own, so the best thing is to let it work it out without interference. What kind of goose egg? Is it common, cross, or rare?
     
  5. horseyjess

    horseyjess Chillin' With My Peeps

    370
    1
    129
    Sep 2, 2009
    SW Florida
    Quote:Its a Pilgrim goose egg. I am going to guess that is common??
     
  6. KlaHaYa Gardens

    KlaHaYa Gardens Chillin' With My Peeps

    690
    3
    123
    Apr 14, 2011
  7. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:That same list shows indian runner ducks on that list too and I am here to tell you there is no shortage of breeding pairs. I would take that list with a grain of salt.
     
  8. KlaHaYa Gardens

    KlaHaYa Gardens Chillin' With My Peeps

    690
    3
    123
    Apr 14, 2011
    Quote:That same list shows indian runner ducks on that list too and I am here to tell you there is no shortage of breeding pairs. I would take that list with a grain of salt.

    I don't know how you determine a shortage of breeding pairs or not. (This is not a hostile remark by any means, nor am I challenging whether or not you are correct, but I don't know you or how you determine/prove breeding pairs.) The bigger point to me, is to share the website with @horseyjess. I don't INTERPRET a website and the quality of the information on behalf of another infividual: it is up to horseyjess to interpret that information as it applies to him/her. Further, whether or not Indian Runner Ducks are on the critical list and if they are sufficient in number to be taken off that list does not affect whether or not a Pilgrim Goose is accurately described on that list as "critical".

    I can tell you from my experience in my area, where there are many bird fanciers, Pilgrim Geese are not easily found.

    In summary, horseyjess may want to guard his/her egg and horseyjess my find the linked site useful information even if you don't find the information useful to your ducks.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2011

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by