Pennsylvania!! Unite!!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by LeBlackbird, Sep 24, 2009.

  1. chicknduck

    chicknduck Chillin' With My Peeps

    861
    2
    123
    May 21, 2010
    Ohio
    Hello other Pennsylvanians. I am forced to rehome my chicks due to zoneing. This is a listing of what I have.
    I have BR's Naked neck turkens buff orphingtons Silver laced Wyandotte White Jersey Giants need to sell ASAP Zoining problem I have to say good bye to all of them. I am just trying to recoop some of the feed cost. I live in Beaver county Pennsylvania. Pick up only. They are very nice birds. $5.00 each. Or best offer.
     
  2. Sillystunt

    Sillystunt Master of the Silly

    Jul 11, 2008
    Winter Haven, FL
    \\
    Quote:How is she doing today?? Better, I hope [​IMG]

    Thanks for thinking of us!. She is back up walking on her hocks when 3 days ago before I had seen the toe movement, her right leg would be extended out in front of her. So, I guess she is doing a little better??? I am continuing with adding an egg to moistened chick feed that has added vitamins to it. I hope she keeps recovering even if it is a little at a time because she is just the sweetest little girl!!! I don't know for sure what had happened to her but 2 weeks ago she was fine in the morning and when I got home that night her left leg was paralyzed and her Right leg was paralyzed by the next day. She is not sick in any way. Eating well, drinking well, poos are normal. None of my other chickens have any symptoms like this. I don't believe it is mareks at all and the only thing I could think it might be is she might have been eating more than her fair share of scratch and has a vitamin deficiency.

    doesn't sound like a vitamin deficiency to me. you can give her poly vit's for babies. Sratch is considered a treat so she should only get a bit. Mareks usually has one foot extended out , make sure there is no mold!!!!have u posted in emergancy section? some vets stroll through postings.
     
  3. animalover

    animalover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    0
    99
    Jul 30, 2010
    Harrisburg, PA
    Quote:How far are you from Harrisburg?
     
  4. NewToFarming

    NewToFarming Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,305
    24
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    Apr 28, 2010
    Millersburg, PA
    Quote:Very glad to hear she seems to be doing better - hope she gets well!

    Is this hospital fairly priced? How much do they charge for an office visit (besides whatever they charge for what's wrong with your baby)?

    Hi, I just took my girl there yesterday and the office visit alone is $85, then with injections and food, it came out to $148 total. They do seem very nice and did spend time with us and the visit lasted about an hour. She did call another vet that knows more on chickens to help her try to figure out what could be wrong with my girl. With that being said, they don't know yet. She is debilitated and needs to be built back up again so she gave her a B vitamin injections and fluid. MAreks cannot be totally ruled out yet. They think maybe she could have both deficiencies and mareks or parasites....so the plan is to try to get her built back up again and go from there. Even if she did have parasites, she is too week to receive treatment for it. Bottom line, they don't know for sure and to keep trying to do what I have been. I did get some baby parrot food for her that she actually really likes and is finally eating better. I did have her on polyvisol and then picked up other vitamins at the feed store and I noticed a decline in her after she was on the other vitamins for about a week. I am switching back to the polyvisol as soon as the store restocks the ones without iron. The truck should be in today, I hope!

    But I think it was a bit pricey but they were nice and did spend time with us. The parrot food was $16 for one pound.
     
  5. NewToFarming

    NewToFarming Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,305
    24
    193
    Apr 28, 2010
    Millersburg, PA
    Quote:Thanks for thinking of us!. She is back up walking on her hocks when 3 days ago before I had seen the toe movement, her right leg would be extended out in front of her. So, I guess she is doing a little better??? I am continuing with adding an egg to moistened chick feed that has added vitamins to it. I hope she keeps recovering even if it is a little at a time because she is just the sweetest little girl!!! I don't know for sure what had happened to her but 2 weeks ago she was fine in the morning and when I got home that night her left leg was paralyzed and her Right leg was paralyzed by the next day. She is not sick in any way. Eating well, drinking well, poos are normal. None of my other chickens have any symptoms like this. I don't believe it is mareks at all and the only thing I could think it might be is she might have been eating more than her fair share of scratch and has a vitamin deficiency.

    doesn't sound like a vitamin deficiency to me. you can give her poly vit's for babies. Sratch is considered a treat so she should only get a bit. Mareks usually has one foot extended out , make sure there is no mold!!!!have u posted in emergancy section? some vets stroll through postings.

    Thanks, yes I did and most were saying a deficiency as well. I did take her to the vet yesterday and they don't know either. I thought mareks spread to others in the flock but the vet there said no, it can affect only one???
    I have had her vitamins ever since she was born but she is a very picky eater and dainty. She takes little tiny bites of food, talks for awhile, then a couple of more small bites and it takes her forever to eat. Maybe she just wasn't eating enough and with the scratch during the cold snap it put her so far down nutritionally??? She has gotten even thinner but she is starting to pick up on eating since yesterday and will eat the parrot food much better than the chick feed. But the vets said mareks cannot be ruled out yet.???[​IMG]
     
  6. jlgoinggreen

    jlgoinggreen Chillin' With My Peeps

    742
    0
    131
    Sep 25, 2009
    South Central PA
    Quote:Is this hospital fairly priced? How much do they charge for an office visit (besides whatever they charge for what's wrong with your baby)?

    Hi, I just took my girl there yesterday and the office visit alone is $85, then with injections and food, it came out to $148 total. They do seem very nice and did spend time with us and the visit lasted about an hour. She did call another vet that knows more on chickens to help her try to figure out what could be wrong with my girl. With that being said, they don't know yet. She is debilitated and needs to be built back up again so she gave her a B vitamin injections and fluid. MAreks cannot be totally ruled out yet. They think maybe she could have both deficiencies and mareks or parasites....so the plan is to try to get her built back up again and go from there. Even if she did have parasites, she is too week to receive treatment for it. Bottom line, they don't know for sure and to keep trying to do what I have been. I did get some baby parrot food for her that she actually really likes and is finally eating better. I did have her on polyvisol and then picked up other vitamins at the feed store and I noticed a decline in her after she was on the other vitamins for about a week. I am switching back to the polyvisol as soon as the store restocks the ones without iron. The truck should be in today, I hope!

    But I think it was a bit pricey but they were nice and did spend time with us. The parrot food was $16 for one pound.

    Oh Wow. I hope you can find out what's wrong with her soon and that she will be alright. I'm so sorry you guys are going through this. [​IMG]

    Weird... the office visit sounds pricey, but the over all charge it ended up totaling after spending so much time with you seems to add up to a fair price. At the same time it stinks that they charged you that much and still don't know what's wrong with her. [​IMG] Did they run any tests to try to find the problem.
     
  7. joerobscatfarm

    joerobscatfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    22
    Oct 11, 2009
    Landenberg, PA
    Quote:Hello Kennett...nearby in Landenberg.[​IMG]
     
  8. Sillystunt

    Sillystunt Master of the Silly

    Jul 11, 2008
    Winter Haven, FL
    Quote:doesn't sound like a vitamin deficiency to me. you can give her poly vit's for babies. Sratch is considered a treat so she should only get a bit. Mareks usually has one foot extended out , make sure there is no mold!!!!have u posted in emergancy section? some vets stroll through postings.

    Thanks, yes I did and most were saying a deficiency as well. I did take her to the vet yesterday and they don't know either. I thought mareks spread to others in the flock but the vet there said no, it can affect only one???
    I have had her vitamins ever since she was born but she is a very picky eater and dainty. She takes little tiny bites of food, talks for awhile, then a couple of more small bites and it takes her forever to eat. Maybe she just wasn't eating enough and with the scratch during the cold snap it put her so far down nutritionally??? She has gotten even thinner but she is starting to pick up on eating since yesterday and will eat the parrot food much better than the chick feed. But the vets said mareks cannot be ruled out yet.???[​IMG]

    make sure you have her quarentined. i don't mean to sound like a bummer but she will get all your chickens sick if it is mareks. the ground will be contaminated also [​IMG] i really pray it's not that!!!!! i still think poison............. [​IMG] i hope she gets better really soon! your ag department usually will have a state vet who will come out. don't know if you tried that but they can drawl blood & run tests for free. Hope she gets better [​IMG] how about worms in her poo? how is the poo looking...sounds gross but it can help rule stuff out......


    your vet is a dunce......sorry, please read this!!!

    Marek's disease is a highly contagious viral neoplastic disease in chickens. It is named after József Marek, a Hungarian veterinarian. Occasionally misdiagnosed as an abtissue pathology it is caused by an alphaherpesvirus known as Marek's disease virus (MDV) or gallid herpesvirus 2 (GaHV-2). The disease is characterized by the presence of T cell lymphoma as well as infiltration of nerves and organs by lymphocytes.[1] Viruses related to MDV appear to be benign and can be used as vaccine strains to prevent Marek's disease. For example, the related Herpesvirus of Turkeys (HVT), causes no apparent disease in turkeys and continues to be used as a vaccine strain for prevention of Marek's disease (see below). Birds infected with GaHV-2 can be carriers and shedders of the virus for life. Newborn chicks are protected by maternal antibodies for a few weeks. After infection, microscopic lesions are present after one to two weeks, and gross lesions are present after three to four weeks. The virus is spread in dander from feather follicles and transmitted by inhalation.[2]

    There are five syndromes known to occur after infection with Marek's disease. These syndromes may overlap.

    Classical Marek's disease or neurolymphomatosis causes asymmetric paralysis of one or more limbs. With vagus nerve involvement, difficulty breathing or dilation of the crop may occur. Besides lesions in the peripheral nerves, there are frequently lymphomatous infiltration/tumours in the skin, skeletal muscle, visceral organs. Organs that are commonly affected include the ovary, spleen, liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, proventriculus and adrenals.

    Acute Marek's disease is an epidemic in a previously uninfected or unvaccinated flock, causing depression, paralysis, and death in a large number of birds (up to 80 percent). The age of onset is much earlier than the classic form, birds are four to eight weeks old when affected. Infiltration into multiple organs/tissue is observed.

    Ocular lymphomatosis causes lymphocyte infiltration of the iris (making the iris turn grey), anisocoria, and blindness.
    Cutaneous Marek's disease causes round, firm lesions at the feather follicles.[2]
    Atherosclerosis is induced in experimentally infected chickens.[3]

    Immunosuppression Impairment of the T-lymphocytes prevent competent immunological response against pathogenic challenge and the affected birds become more succeptible to disease conditions such as coccidiosis and "Escherichia coli" infection .[4] Furthermore, without stimulation by cell-mediated immunity, the humoral immunity conferred by the B-cell lines from the Bursa of Fabricius also shuts down. Thus resulting in birds that are totally immunocompromised.

    [edit] DiagnosisThe demonstration of nerve enlargement, especially with the ischiatic nerve along with suggestive clinical signs in a bird that is around three to four months old is highly suggestive of Marek's Disease. The presence of nodules on the internal organs may also suggest Marek's disease but further testing is required for confirmation. This is done through histological demonstration of lymphomatous infiltration into the affected tissue. A range of leukocytes can be involved, including lyphocytic cell lines such as large lymphocyte, lymphoblast, primitive reticular cells and occasional plasma cells as well as macrophage and plasma cells. The T-cells are involved in the malignancy, showing neoplastic changes with evidence of mitosis.

    The lymphomatous infiltrates need to be differentiated with another condition that affects poultry known as Lymphoid Leukosis as well as an inflammatory event associated with hyperplastic changes of the affected tissue.

    [edit] PreventionVaccination is the only known method to prevent the development of tumors when chickens are infected with the virus. However, administration of vaccines does not prevent transmission of the virus; i.e., the vaccine is non-sterilizing.[1] However, it does reduce the amount of virus shed in the dander and hence reduce horizontal spread of the disease. Marek's Disease does not spread vertically. The vaccine was introduced in 1970. Before that, Marek's disease caused substantial revenue loss in the poultry industries of the United States and the United Kingdom. The vaccine can be administered to one day old chicks through sub-cutaneous inoculation or by in-ovo vaccination when the eggs are transferred from the incubator to the hatcher. In-ovo vaccination is the preferred method, as it does not require handling of the chicks and can be done rapidly by automated methods. Immunity develops within two weeks.[2]

    The vaccine originally contained the antigenically similar turkey herpesvirus, which is serotype 3 of MDV.[5] However, because vaccination does not prevent infection with the virus,[6] the Marek's Disease virus has evolved increased virulence and resistance to this vaccine. As a result, current vaccines use a combination of vaccines consisting of HVT and gallid herpesvirus type 3 or an attenuated MDV strain, CVI988-Rispens (ATCvet code: QI01AD03).[7]

    I Still think it's something else!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  9. Sillystunt

    Sillystunt Master of the Silly

    Jul 11, 2008
    Winter Haven, FL
  10. NewToFarming

    NewToFarming Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,305
    24
    193
    Apr 28, 2010
    Millersburg, PA
    Quote:Thanks, yes I did and most were saying a deficiency as well. I did take her to the vet yesterday and they don't know either. I thought mareks spread to others in the flock but the vet there said no, it can affect only one???
    I have had her vitamins ever since she was born but she is a very picky eater and dainty. She takes little tiny bites of food, talks for awhile, then a couple of more small bites and it takes her forever to eat. Maybe she just wasn't eating enough and with the scratch during the cold snap it put her so far down nutritionally??? She has gotten even thinner but she is starting to pick up on eating since yesterday and will eat the parrot food much better than the chick feed. But the vets said mareks cannot be ruled out yet.???[​IMG]

    make sure you have her quarentined. i don't mean to sound like a bummer but she will get all your chickens sick if it is mareks. the ground will be contaminated also [​IMG] i really pray it's not that!!!!! i still think poison............. [​IMG] i hope she gets better really soon! your ag department usually will have a state vet who will come out. don't know if you tried that but they can drawl blood & run tests for free. Hope she gets better [​IMG] how about worms in her poo? how is the poo looking...sounds gross but it can help rule stuff out......


    your vet is a dunce......sorry, please read this!!!

    Marek's disease is a highly contagious viral neoplastic disease in chickens. It is named after József Marek, a Hungarian veterinarian. Occasionally misdiagnosed as an abtissue pathology it is caused by an alphaherpesvirus known as Marek's disease virus (MDV) or gallid herpesvirus 2 (GaHV-2). The disease is characterized by the presence of T cell lymphoma as well as infiltration of nerves and organs by lymphocytes.[1] Viruses related to MDV appear to be benign and can be used as vaccine strains to prevent Marek's disease. For example, the related Herpesvirus of Turkeys (HVT), causes no apparent disease in turkeys and continues to be used as a vaccine strain for prevention of Marek's disease (see below). Birds infected with GaHV-2 can be carriers and shedders of the virus for life. Newborn chicks are protected by maternal antibodies for a few weeks. After infection, microscopic lesions are present after one to two weeks, and gross lesions are present after three to four weeks. The virus is spread in dander from feather follicles and transmitted by inhalation.[2]

    There are five syndromes known to occur after infection with Marek's disease. These syndromes may overlap.

    Classical Marek's disease or neurolymphomatosis causes asymmetric paralysis of one or more limbs. With vagus nerve involvement, difficulty breathing or dilation of the crop may occur. Besides lesions in the peripheral nerves, there are frequently lymphomatous infiltration/tumours in the skin, skeletal muscle, visceral organs. Organs that are commonly affected include the ovary, spleen, liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, proventriculus and adrenals.

    Acute Marek's disease is an epidemic in a previously uninfected or unvaccinated flock, causing depression, paralysis, and death in a large number of birds (up to 80 percent). The age of onset is much earlier than the classic form, birds are four to eight weeks old when affected. Infiltration into multiple organs/tissue is observed.

    Ocular lymphomatosis causes lymphocyte infiltration of the iris (making the iris turn grey), anisocoria, and blindness.
    Cutaneous Marek's disease causes round, firm lesions at the feather follicles.[2]
    Atherosclerosis is induced in experimentally infected chickens.[3]

    Immunosuppression Impairment of the T-lymphocytes prevent competent immunological response against pathogenic challenge and the affected birds become more succeptible to disease conditions such as coccidiosis and "Escherichia coli" infection .[4] Furthermore, without stimulation by cell-mediated immunity, the humoral immunity conferred by the B-cell lines from the Bursa of Fabricius also shuts down. Thus resulting in birds that are totally immunocompromised.

    [edit] DiagnosisThe demonstration of nerve enlargement, especially with the ischiatic nerve along with suggestive clinical signs in a bird that is around three to four months old is highly suggestive of Marek's Disease. The presence of nodules on the internal organs may also suggest Marek's disease but further testing is required for confirmation. This is done through histological demonstration of lymphomatous infiltration into the affected tissue. A range of leukocytes can be involved, including lyphocytic cell lines such as large lymphocyte, lymphoblast, primitive reticular cells and occasional plasma cells as well as macrophage and plasma cells. The T-cells are involved in the malignancy, showing neoplastic changes with evidence of mitosis.

    The lymphomatous infiltrates need to be differentiated with another condition that affects poultry known as Lymphoid Leukosis as well as an inflammatory event associated with hyperplastic changes of the affected tissue.

    [edit] PreventionVaccination is the only known method to prevent the development of tumors when chickens are infected with the virus. However, administration of vaccines does not prevent transmission of the virus; i.e., the vaccine is non-sterilizing.[1] However, it does reduce the amount of virus shed in the dander and hence reduce horizontal spread of the disease. Marek's Disease does not spread vertically. The vaccine was introduced in 1970. Before that, Marek's disease caused substantial revenue loss in the poultry industries of the United States and the United Kingdom. The vaccine can be administered to one day old chicks through sub-cutaneous inoculation or by in-ovo vaccination when the eggs are transferred from the incubator to the hatcher. In-ovo vaccination is the preferred method, as it does not require handling of the chicks and can be done rapidly by automated methods. Immunity develops within two weeks.[2]

    The vaccine originally contained the antigenically similar turkey herpesvirus, which is serotype 3 of MDV.[5] However, because vaccination does not prevent infection with the virus,[6] the Marek's Disease virus has evolved increased virulence and resistance to this vaccine. As a result, current vaccines use a combination of vaccines consisting of HVT and gallid herpesvirus type 3 or an attenuated MDV strain, CVI988-Rispens (ATCvet code: QI01AD03).[7]

    I Still think it's something else!!!

    Thank you so much! I think you are right and I don't believe it is Mareks either. If it were, I am sure others in flock would be affected by now. I just can't believe she would be the only one to show symptoms.
    No offense about the vet being a dunce! [​IMG] She is the only one in the area that would look at her. She said she could do blood work but it would cost another $175 just for the labs and I just put out $148 for what was done.
    She is picking up on her eating especially the parrot food. She is bright, alert, seems very happy and is enjoying all of her snuggle time. She does not seem to be in any other distress except her legs are paralyzed. I do have her separated and in the house from the first day she was like this.
    Her poos look perfectly normal. The vet could have done a stool test but I really didn't think to bring a sample along and they did not mention it when I called but I can take one back to her. They do free range so I am sure it is possible she ate something she shouldn't have but there is nothing I could really see in the coop or surrounding area that was moldy.
    She seemed to actually start doing better but then this past saturday it seemed she declined and went back to square one. Initially her left leg was worse but now it seems the right leg is now worse than the left. Her left foot turns in but the right foot doesn't. She did become infested with lice/mites during these past 3 weeks. I checked the others in the coop and I couldn't find any on the others but she was loaded with them. I did treat her twice for them as well as the rest of the flock/coop and now it seems like they are totally gone on her. I had asked the vet about this and she said all birds have lice/mites and they were overwhelming on her because she was debilitated?
    Does botulism cause paralysis?
    Thanks for your help on this!
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011

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