Pictures of Coop Construction. The first real build is DONE!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by silkiechicken, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Preface:

    All coops thus far have been wood and wire tractors and one lowe's play house that was pre-cut. Skill level (1-10) was probably 2.

    This project in particular was all made possible by the contents of this box which I was lucky enough to be able to find about 6 years ago:

    It's an all in one unit that does EVERYTHING!
    [​IMG]



    For the coop....we started with a plan:
    [​IMG]


    Front
    [​IMG]

    Back
    [​IMG]

    Sides
    [​IMG]

    Floor
    [​IMG]

    Roof
    [​IMG]

    Supples mostly bought from Lowe's. They were VERY helpful in moving pieces and loading the truck!
    It is a 6x8 shed with a 4 in 12 roof.
    5 ft tall in the back, 7ft tall in the front.
    Floors are made of 2x6's on skids, 16 on center.
    Load bearing walls are 16 on center. (Front and back)
    16x20 windows on 3 sides.
    Rafters are 2x4's and attached with strong ties.
    Roof has 12 inch overhang on sides, 14 in front, 7 in back... to best optimize a full length 2x4x8.
    Exterior 1/2 ply on floor is sturdy with 16OC floors.
    Walls are all wood T1-11.


    Planning and supply collecting time ~10 hours?


    Then started to build:

    Floor. 2x6x8's.
    [​IMG]

    Foundation with floor on skids and blocks. Not a high wind area so I hope it does not move.
    [​IMG]

    Front wall framing
    [​IMG]

    Front wall with siding
    [​IMG]

    Front, sides, and back up
    [​IMG]

    End of day two of building
    [​IMG]

    Rafters
    [​IMG]

    End of building on break, out of time!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Total time thus far on feet working on the building: ~24 solid hours not including breaks.

    What is left to do:
    1) Make the 3rd window
    2) Make a door
    3) Finish nailing all pieces on
    4) Paint interior and exterior
    5) Felt and shingle the roof
    6) Add the trim and paint it
    7) Cover all ventilation holes with wire
    8) Make nest boxes and roosts.

    Est 24-36 solid standing hours to finish.


    UPDATE


    Three more days working and here is the result so far! All the ply is nailed in every 6 inches on edges and every 12 inches otherwise. All gaps caulked or puttied prior to painting. The painting part takes a good amount of time because of all the waiting for the primer to dry, then the first coat to dry, then second coat to dry. Rain on one of the three days slowed down progress too. Yes... rain happens this time of year in WA. LOL

    Apple-a-day Red exterior red with white trim.
    [​IMG]

    Bright interior door makes it obvious the door is still open at night. Don't close it behind you though... the release string to the latch isn't installed yet!!!
    [​IMG]

    Interior walls and floor painted.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Drip edges and roof installed. Used Certanteed Presidential Shake TL Lifetime Shingles. Dang things are thick, hard to cut, and really really really heavy.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And here is the trim ready to install.
    [​IMG]


    What is left...

    1) Even out shingles on roof
    2) Install and finish trim
    3) Touch up paint anything requied
    4) Build and install roost
    5) Build and install nest box

    The building inspectors have already made their dust bath just behind the building and dusted the wet paint with fine dirt... Guess they like to bathe in privacy and help customize their coop. [​IMG]

    I want to make a raised nest box, but my chickens have spent the last 12 years laying on ground floor nests... with my luck they will lay all their eggs under any nest boxes.


    Update #2!

    Made a nest box, put together roosts, made a feeder, and installed the chickens!


    Finished coop!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Installed roosts:
    [​IMG]

    Nest box:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Nest box installed and in use:

    [​IMG]

    Feeder:
    [​IMG]

    Inside feeder bottom slant so food comes out:
    [​IMG]


    Feeder installed:
    [​IMG]

    One last thing left... a watering solution!
     
    2 people like this.
  2. swmalone

    swmalone Chillin' With My Peeps

    257
    2
    116
    Jun 30, 2011
    Northern Utah
    I wish I had enough space and the ability to have enough chickens to have a coop like that.
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:You can do it! This is esentially a first for the two of us who put it together so far.

    I plan on putting in up to maybe 10 chickens in there. I fence less free range so they won't have a run.

    As for skill...

    This is my first real foundation coop that is not a play house or tractor style coop. I currently have one play house and 3 tractors which were easy and quick vs this guy.
     
  4. swmalone

    swmalone Chillin' With My Peeps

    257
    2
    116
    Jun 30, 2011
    Northern Utah
    I live in town and on a 1/5th of an acre, so not a lot of room for extra structures, also I will max out at 5 chickens. If I were to build something that size I would have to take down a shed or take up a good section of garden area. I built a chicken ark that I am using for 3 birds now, I have another post that I am hoping to get more ideas for coops for small yards.
     
  5. sammyh312

    sammyh312 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    0
    79
    May 22, 2011
    great job! I need another and that would do it.
     
  6. mestaske

    mestaske Out Of The Brooder

    98
    1
    41
    Feb 14, 2011
    Southern Colorado
    nice all in one unit. Nice coop
     
  7. ThinkingChickens

    ThinkingChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,027
    12
    151
    Feb 18, 2011
    I really like this coop. I think you've got some good space for a fair amount of girls.
     
  8. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Thanks! I'll update this when I get back home to do more work on it.
     
  9. Roadstump

    Roadstump Out Of The Brooder

    30
    0
    22
    Jan 22, 2011
    Boerne, Texas
    nicely done and very helpful documentation with your pics. consider mounting outside nest boxes to save on floor space.
     
  10. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member


    UPDATE


    Three more days working and here is the result so far! All the ply is nailed in every 6 inches on edges and every 12 inches otherwise. All gaps caulked or puttied prior to painting. .

    Apple-a-day Red exterior red with white trim.
    [​IMG]

    Bright interior door makes it obvious the door is still open at night. Don't close it behind you though... the release string to the latch isn't installed yet!!!
    [​IMG]

    Interior walls and floor painted.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Drip edges and roof installed. Used Certanteed Presidential Shake TL Lifetime Shingles. Dang things are thick, hard to cut, and really really really heavy.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    And here is the trim ready to install.
    [​IMG]


    What is left...

    1) Even out shingles on roof
    2) Install and finish trim
    3) Touch up paint anything requied
    4) Build and install roost
    5) Build and install nest box

    The building inspectors have already made their dust bath just behind the building and dusted the wet paint with fine dirt... Guess they like to bathe in privacy and help customize their coop. [​IMG]

    I want to make a raised nest box, but my chickens have spent the last 12 years laying on ground floor nests... with my luck they will lay all their eggs under any nest boxes.


    Total material only cost so far...

    $836.13

    We already had the shingles from when the house was being done.

    We won't get into tools or transportation to coop site costs. LOL
     

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