PLANNED POULTRY GUARDING DOG

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by centrarchid, Dec 4, 2010.

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  1. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    dainerra,

    Coyotes attack dogs her too but dogs typically smaller (mop dogs and like) than coyote or intrude area immediately around coyote den site. In latter situation, a single coyote will at least try to bluff dog in defense of pups.


    WyoDreamer,

    Scoob spends most of day romping which chews up some of his energy. We also play a lot of fetch. No containment methods as of yet which may become issue later. If he does not pose risk to neighbors livestock that will continue. Trying to get him introduced to neighbors to reduce conflicts. Others have dogs running loose and they do not pose risk to livestock. Our property has a lot of attractions for a dog to keep his mind from iddling.

    I intend to develop Scoobs hunting by targeting rabbits and squirrels but so far he ignores rabbits and chases only our cats (sleeps with them too). He has demonstrated excellent turtle tracking and treeing skills. Last night he found a three-toed box turtle laying eggs in one of my bramble patches. He is also very good a catching voles.
     
  2. Pele

    Pele Songster

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    Boise
    Quote:I am very familiar with coyote hunting methods (I am also zoologist that studies wildlife). Coyotes in my area largely single hunters. Pack activity when it comes to territorial disputes (between packs) usually has cooperation of only mated pair. The pups that add up to six howl a lot but noncombatents.

    My German short-haired pointers will weigh 55 to 75 pounds and be operating on their home turf. Size extremely important, more often than not dogs will have coyotes out numbered and home turf in itself gives dogs confidence and gives coyotes pause when hunting in someone elses turf.

    If we had wolves or coyote - wolf hybrids as exist in NE US, then your concerns would be shared and dog breed and number of dogs would have to be upgraded or my free range system would be revised. My reality is 35 pound coyotes and 35 pound bobcats, both will stand down when my 55 pound plus LGD presses issue.

    I am not a romantic in respect to invulnerability of wildlife. They are mortal and will seldom put themselves at risk for a piddly meal of chicken. I also will use firemarms if needed but will face hand to hand any predator except a skunk if gun not immediately available since I am up on my shots.

    You are correct about the 100% pure coyote. They are very solitary and are actually very shy. However, I believe more and more Americans are dealing with Coyote/dog hybrids. And nothing is more dangerous than a pack of wild dogs. They don't fear humans, and gang up in big packs.

    I recently read a genetic study of Coyote, Wolf, and Dog hybrids, and there is no longer any areas in the Eastern United States where Coyotes or Wolves are pure. All have some degree of dog hybridization. The Western half of the States still had pure populations, but there is an increase in crossovers even here too.

    So I very much believe Dainerra is having problems with packs of coyotes. They're probably near 40% to 50% dog. And I can easily imagine them ganging up on a lone dog and ripping it apart.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2011
  3. comptonsgonecountry

    comptonsgonecountry Songster

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    Scoob is gorgeous! He seems to be handling his duties well [​IMG]
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Pele,

    Please provide links to papers supporting your position. All papers I have read indicate domestic dog intergradation into wild coyote population is extremely low and grey wolf integradation is limited to to northeastern U.S. I used to be of camp thinking coy-dogs were a problem but science refutes.
     
  5. dainerra

    dainerra Crowing

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    I'm not Pele and don't have papers, but I do know that there are a lot of people in rural areas who decided it would be "cool" to breed coy-dogs. they would tie out a female in heat and keeping close watch to drive away stray dogs, would breed coy-dogs. of course, like wolf-hybrids, they made horrible pets so lots of them were just turned loose.
     
  6. Pele

    Pele Songster

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    Quote:Sure! It's a really interesting paper. They noted that only Western coyotes and wolves are pure.

    "The research results are especially relevant to wolves and coyotes in the Northeast. The study shows a gradient of hybridization in wolves, with pure wolves in western states and increasing hybridization as you move east."

    http://northcountrynow.com/news/coy...ty-are-wolf-dog-hybrids-scientist-says-029062
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Quote:Sure! It's a really interesting paper. They noted that only Western coyotes and wolves are pure.

    "The research results are especially relevant to wolves and coyotes in the Northeast. The study shows a gradient of hybridization in wolves, with pure wolves in western states and increasing hybridization as you move east."

    http://northcountrynow.com/news/coy...ty-are-wolf-dog-hybrids-scientist-says-029062

    I am familiar with work cited by popular article. Coyotes in my area not a problem.
     
  8. homesteadapps

    homesteadapps Songster

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    We have a Border Collie / Lab cross that has been great with the chickens and other animals.
     
  9. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Quote:Seems like a cross requiring a little training as well. When they require training, it makes for a more flexible dog in end. Great Pyreneese we have at work do not seem particularly trainable such as go to a particular paddick when given a verbal command. Or get out of hauling trailer, you are not going to market!
     
  10. jenkassai

    jenkassai Songster

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    Quote:Seems like a cross requiring a little training as well. When they require training, it makes for a more flexible dog in end. Great Pyreneese we have at work do not seem particularly trainable such as go to a particular paddick when given a verbal command. Or get out of hauling trailer, you are not going to market!

    I'm sure the Pyre could eventually grasp the concept of going where told, it would just require more training because it is a more independent dog, that is not how it "worked" traditionally, and it might not always do what you ask when you ask. It would be more inclined to question "Why should I do that?" The Great Pyrenees is a breed that is used to working by itself, making its own decisions. GSPs, Labs and Border Collies traditionally worked much more closely with humans and tend to be more biddable, or "flexible" if you prefer.

    Not a dog trainer, biologist, etc here, just someone who's been "in" dogs for almost 20 yrs, and enjoy the company of aloof/independent breeds [​IMG]
     
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