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Please help! Hatching chicks in Kindergarten

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Miss S, May 23, 2017.

  1. Miss S

    Miss S New Egg

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    May 23, 2017
    Hi!

    I purchased the incu view incubator. My eggs have been in for 11 days, steady temp of 99.5.

    Earlier i did a little more research to prepare for the hatch day. I read that the eggs need plenty of oxygen. I looked on cover of incubator and thought to myself there are no holes, then I saw the little black plug as my heart dropped. I JUST took out the plug on day 11!

    Does this mean my embryos couldn't have survived?!
     
  2. gamebirdsonly

    gamebirdsonly Overrun With Chickens

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    Did your incubator come with a manual? It should tell you about the plug and when to take it out ect.. I know with the Styrofoam incubators they came with two red plugs and you would take either one or both out during last three days of incubation if memory serves me right.
     
  3. Miss S

    Miss S New Egg

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    May 23, 2017
    thank you for responding

    yes, the manual explains that temp and humidity are important for a good hatch. Nothing about oxygen or the black plug. I went on amazon to read reviews. No one mentioned the plug but someone did comment how the manual wasn't very helpful.

    I've read wonderful reviews that this incubator works beautifully, I just hope I didn't kill any unborn chicks from lack on oxygen
     
  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Many people leave plugs in for the first ten days, some that have duo plugs will leave one in and hatchers like me discard the plugs altogether and always have them out/open. The good thing is you've discovered it prior to hatching which is the most important point that they need that fresh air. You should be fine.
    The incuview bators are gaining positive rep these days and seem to be good bators.
    Because this is for a kindergarten class and I know how special it is for these kids to see hatchers, I'm going to butt my nose in and ask a couple questions that you didn't ask advice on but that I see the most problems with for new hatchers. Have you checked the accuracy of the thermometers/hygrometers and what range are you running humidity at?
     
    wynn4578 likes this.
  5. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    Also, :welcome
     
  6. Miss S

    Miss S New Egg

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    HI thank you for responding!

    OK that makes me feel better about the oxygen

    and oh no! I didnt put a thermometer inside, I was going to like i did last year with the styrofoam incubator but I it would block the tray from moving back and forth to turn eggs.

    Im confused- how often should I add water to the ? In order for me to add water i need to lift the tray that the eggs are on to add water to bottom but im suppose to keep it closed?

    We are on day 12 and the hygrometer reads hatching period, clearly there is too much water in there.

    I had a successful hatch last year with styrofoam incubator, I hand turned eggs 5 times a day and hatched 4 chicks out of 7 eggs. This year-I was given the incuview as a classroom gift so i wouldnt have to come to school 5 times a day over the weekend but im stressing out that I cant read the humidity %, only shows temp or will show if i need to add water.

    Sorry i know my post is ALL over the place! im just so nervous!

    Thank you!
     
  7. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    First off, there is no threat to the eggs opening the incubator during incubation. And honestly there's not much threat during incubation if your humidity is up for hatch.
    As for how much water should be in there now, I am a big recommender of low humidity incubation, running dry when possible and monitor the air cells to know if it needs to be adjusted. I am going to give you a humidity link to help with that. http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity
     
  8. Miss S

    Miss S New Egg

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    May 23, 2017
    thank you so much!!
     
    AmyLynn2374 likes this.
  9. CDcluck

    CDcluck Out Of The Brooder

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    Embryos don't use up that much oxygen, don't worry about the first ten days. Especially if you are opening the 'bator now and then to candle or add water, that's plenty of air exchange for them until close to hatch.

    Humidity gets fussier the closer you get to hatch, but there is still a rather wide range of adequate. The only time I've ever seen negative results is when there is a sudden dramatic drop in humidity (like taking the top off the 'bator) during the hatch. Chicks that have pipped but not unzipped far enough can get stuck in their shells- the inner membrane gets tough if it dries out suddenly. Those chicks will likely die without intervention.

    The hatching process will raise the humidity level inside the incubator as the fluids that were inside the eggs are exposed as the chicks hatch. It can get to where condensation starts covering the windows, that would be a good time to make sure the vent plugs are definitely open so that there's not so much humidity that there's "no air in the air". Otherwise, just look, don't touch, until you are sure everyone is out of the egg.
     
    Miss S likes this.
  10. Miss S

    Miss S New Egg

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    May 23, 2017
    thank you everyone! Very helpful!!
     

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