Please help with sick peacock

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by ThaiDye, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Tylan (tylosin) is a very powerful drug, but it's not very effective on bacterial like E.coli.

    -Kathy
     
  2. Shay1Bear

    Shay1Bear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, so if she was yours and knowing everything I have done so far what would you do next? Im so stressed out about it[​IMG] I would think E.coli would be treated with a antibiotic but im not sure. I haven't had a sick pea until her so this is all new to me.
     
  3. Shay1Bear

    Shay1Bear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] she looks alot better and has alot of energy and a great appetit.
     
  4. Shay1Bear

    Shay1Bear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] her feathers are starting to come in on her neck. Shes just my Little Eagle now not my Little bald Eagle. Should I still treat the rest of my flock with the Corid if she hasn't been around any of them?
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    It won't hurt to treat them.

    -Kathy
     
  6. Garden Peas

    Garden Peas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it were my bird, I would finish out this second round of antibiotic in this bird, I would treat EVERYONE for coccidia, and I would worm ALL the birds.

    And I would look at every bird really, really closely for any signs of illness: sneezing, mucous, watery poo, listless, ruffly feathers, lack of appetite, icky feathers below the vent, eye drainage or irritation, weird breathing... anything that didn't look exactly right....

    Doctors use different antibiotics on different diseases, because not every bug responds equally well to every antibiotic. It could be that the one she had is responding to the Tylan just a little more slowly than some other bugs might.

    It's also possible that having coccidia or worms made her more susceptible to the respiratory infection.

    She was originally with the other bird, and the other bird has been with your other birds. If it's coccidia, everyone has been exposed, but maybe some of them have more resistance, since birds develop a natural resistance to coccidia. But it won't hurt any of them to get treated for it with the Corid, and it may help them keep from getting sick.

    I'm certainly not a vet, and there are lots of other folks on here with more experience, so maybe they will have other ideas?

    I hope she continues to improve.... but you gotta do something about that poo before she gets sicker again.
     
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  7. Shay1Bear

    Shay1Bear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay good deal[​IMG]
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    You said you already wormed her, right? how much for how many days?

    -Kathy
     
  9. Shay1Bear

    Shay1Bear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With the safeguard I have her .5ml orally for 5 days and I worked the rest of my flock using the dosage chart for safeguard.
     
  10. Trefoil

    Trefoil Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Adding Apple cider vinegar to their (all peas) water doesn't cost big bucks and seems to help keep them from getting most "bugs" floating around. I don't measure the amount, a couple of tablespoons/gallon or a couple of glugs from the bottle. It is supposed to help acidify the stomach and aid in digestion and make it a less hospitable place for parasites. Just don't go overboard, too much and it affects their ability to utilize Calcium.
     

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