Please Talk to Me About Electric Net Fencing

3KillerBs

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
5,421
11,835
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North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
We've moved to our property and are camping in a shed's that's been converted to a cabin on what will eventually be the "front lawn" of the house, which is dead-flat and planted in the dreaded and hated centipede grass. DH and I were sitting out there, talking about the repairs on the little coop with the monitor roof that I've posted a photo of here.

I asked him, jokingly, if he'd mind if I ran some chickens there to intentionally destroy the centipede grass and fertilize the soil so that we could plant decent grass instead. He agreed that it could be possible and reminded me about the electric net fencing that a homesteader he follows on YouTube was using -- one that had small openings at the bottom to keep chicks in. We'd be able to put up temporary shade structures -- maybe as simple as stretching a tarp from the coop to the ground or pitching a picnic fly (which we were considering anyway).

We know a good deal about construction and managing a dog-proof, in-town run but very little about country things like electric fence. Can you talk to me about the basics of this type of portable fence that isn't intended to be permanent? What would we need to know about choosing, buying, setting up, and maintaining electric net fencing?

My first thought was to wonder how I'd get in and out of it when the coop itself isn't walk-through?
 

Tre3hugger

Let Your Freak Flag Fly
Mar 21, 2020
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I would check out the products on www.premeir1supplies.com. They have a few different options to read about and learn the differences and terminology, even if you don't purchase from them. To get in and out of the fenced area, you un-clip a conductor and separate two poles. It's about as easy as opening the latch on a gate.
I plan on purchasing the Permanet option from Premier soon. It is middle ground as dar as permanence goes. It is intended to be moved a few times a year, and will hold up better to snow. It has thicker poles and double spike bottoms instead of single. Another option is the poultrynet line. This is more mobile, intended for weekly moving. It is a little lighter etc. I can't wait to get one of these! I have seen them in action in farms I have worked on and they are awesome. They are pricey but I love the idea of rotational grazing, or focused grazing for insect control like you want to do. Let us know what you decide.
 

Tre3hugger

Let Your Freak Flag Fly
Mar 21, 2020
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Asking questions and learning is far from ignorant! I would ask around in the state thread for North Carolina on this site for chicks. Then craigslist. You will find some, may just have to pay a couple bucks more. Couple more thoughts on electric fencing... You could get a solar starter kit with fencing energizer battery bells whistles etc. for 500 dollars for a 25x25 foot space(100 ft roll). Also, it is crucial to mow the grass at least in a strip where the fence actually sits on the ground. Tall grass will cause the fence to continuously react to the slight touch and very quickly drain the battery. Don't quote me but I believe this is referred to as latency.
 

3KillerBs

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Jul 10, 2009
5,421
11,835
846
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
Also, it is crucial to mow the grass at least in a strip where the fence actually sits on the ground.

Centipede grass only grows about 2-3" tall -- one of the reasons people plant it and we dislike it (another being that I like to go barefoot and it's like walking on ball bearings). But we keep this section mowed anyway to keep the false dandelions and other weeds from looking too ragged.

It's perfectly flat so I could drop the deck to the minimum cut and do no harm to the machinery.
 

Tre3hugger

Let Your Freak Flag Fly
Mar 21, 2020
2,535
8,020
456
NW Massachusetts
Centipede grass only grows about 2-3" tall -- one of the reasons people plant it and we dislike it (another being that I like to go barefoot and it's like walking on ball bearings). But we keep this section mowed anyway to keep the false dandelions and other weeds from looking too ragged.

It's perfectly flat so I could drop the deck to the minimum cut and do no harm to the machinery.
Sounds like a good spot for some poultry netting!
 

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