Polycarbonate Coop Roofing question

laneaj

Songster
May 24, 2021
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Clarksville Tennessee
I'm using the Suntop corrugated polycarbonate sheets for a Monitor style roof coop. I live in hot humid area so I want to leave the overhangs open with hardware cloth.
My question is for this product do I need to use the horizontal and vertical closure strips in construction or is just attaching the polycarbonate sheets straight to the 2x4 perlins work fine.
 

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U_Stormcrow

Free Ranging
Jun 7, 2020
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1) Take this with a grain of salt, I've considered using these panels multiple times, but I never have. Here's why.

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The screws go thru the top of the "ridge". The panels of course expand and contract as they heat and cool. Perfectly normal, natural, and entirely unavoidable.

If the screws are secured to the purlins, then all the stress of that movement is focused on the hole you drilled for the screw penetration. That's a recipe for failure unless strips are used to stabilize that surface. Preferably hard strips, not the foam, which doesn't seem "rigid enough" to me to effectively transfer those loads.

Meaning that, in theory at least, that the closure strips are needed to maximize the life of the panels, which significantly increases the cost of install.

Same problem is present in metal roofing of similar profile. Which is why I use the "5v" panel design and screw thru the flats - but that doesn't help you with the PalRoof. Their Suntuff panel ALSO wants screwes at the top "crest", rather than on the flats. I consider it to be a defect in the design of them

If you are set on using them - and there are good reasons to do so when other means of getting light into a space aren't available - but short term cost is a concern, and lifespan is less concerning, I'd use Suntuff with its geometric hex design and flats instead of the PalRuf wave, and install thru the flat anyways. and likely thru a dense white foam roll sealing strip. Which will, of course, void the warranties.
 

laneaj

Songster
May 24, 2021
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Clarksville Tennessee
This video at 21:45 shows how he didn't use the vertical or horizontal closure strips...is that 1x3 he is attaching the roofing to...I believe? Looks like he also screwed at low spot rather than high spot on panel. Doesn't look like he used flashing or anything.
I already have the Suntop panels here and no way of takin them back as they are 12' long.
I just want to go about installing them so there are no leaks and plenty ventilation for winter through the eaves and the monitor roofing section.
 
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U_Stormcrow

Free Ranging
Jun 7, 2020
4,683
13,670
536
North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
This video at 21:45 shows how he didn't use the vertical or horizontal closure strips...is that 1x3 he is attaching the roofing to...I believe? Looks like he also screwed at low spot rather than high spot on panel. Doesn't look like he used flashing or anything.
I already have the Suntop panels here and no way of takin them back as they are 12' long.
I just want to go about installing them so there are no leaks and plenty ventilation for winter through the eaves and the monitor roofing section.
Yes, he is (according to the MFG) doing it wrong. Pretty typical of Youtuber videos, in my experience.

It will work, for a time. It will not work as long as it should.

The 1x3, btw, is called a "purlin".
 

K0k0shka

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
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Yes...since I live in such a hot humid area I'm hoping I can do without those so as to allow more ventilation. Do you think they would hold up structurally just attached to purlins?
I wouldn't compromise the structural soundness of the roof because of the tiny amount of ventilation you'd get in those little gaps. Coops need way more ventilation than that, especially if you live in a hot, humid climate. Those gaps won't make much of a difference. But they support the corrugation of the panels and will extend the life of the roof. Plan on adding lots of actual ventilation (large open areas protected by hardware cloth) and don't worry about the closure strip spaces.

If you use closure strips to secure both ends of each panel, the middle will probably be fine just being drilled into the purlins. But I'm not a pro so can't say for sure if that's a good or a bad idea. The closure strips are easy to cut, so, just to be safe, you can cut a small section to insert and drill through where the panels attach to the purlins. They are not expensive either, so won't add too much to the total cost of the roof. Each strip is about a dollar (they come in packs of 6).
 

laneaj

Songster
May 24, 2021
643
1,848
246
Clarksville Tennessee
I wouldn't compromise the structural soundness of the roof because of the tiny amount of ventilation you'd get in those little gaps. Coops need way more ventilation than that, especially if you live in a hot, humid climate. Those gaps won't make much of a difference. But they support the corrugation of the panels and will extend the life of the roof. Plan on adding lots of actual ventilation (large open areas protected by hardware cloth) and don't worry about the closure strip spaces.

If you use closure strips to secure both ends of each panel, the middle will probably be fine just being drilled into the purlins. But I'm not a pro so can't say for sure if that's a good or a bad idea. The closure strips are easy to cut, so, just to be safe, you can cut a small section to insert and drill through where the panels attach to the purlins. They are not expensive either, so won't add too much to the total cost of the roof. Each strip is about a dollar (they come in packs of 6).
Good point...especially since I'll have the monitor roof which will be nearly all open for ventilation.
 

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