erlibrd

Free Ranging
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Oct 8, 2010
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The outside of my new coop is done!!! Now I (we, OK my DH) will be cutting out the pop door and I'm not sure how I want it done. I know how I don't want it though, my current little coop has a door that slides up to open and its plywood that warps in the weather.
The new coop will be insulated so we plan to insulate the door, it will probably have the hinges at the top?
Could I see pictures of pop doors from everyone? give me some ideas? Please
 

WoodlandWoman

Crowing
12 Years
May 8, 2007
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I have an automatic door that slides up now, that works great. It's a metal door. If you like the sliding style of door and the warping is the only problem, you could use a metal door.

Before we put in the auto door, that coop had a hinged plywood door. I designed the coop for deep litter, so the door is elevated, to keep litter inside. I hinged the door at the bottom and the door opened down into the litter to make a ramp. You could also make one with the hinges on top. I frame in openings with 2x4s. This gives it stability and also a sturdy place to attach hardware. I like wood screws for attaching hardware, so they can't be pulled out, which has happened to a few people.

To lock my hinged door, which was on the inside of the coop, I just added slide latches to the two sides. In my case, a latch at the top would have worked, too. If you hinge yours at the top, you'll also need a way to lock it open. If it's installed on the outside, you need a latch or lock that raccoons can't open, to lock it closed.

To prevent warping, I use exterior grade plywood, paint with exterior grade paint and have large roof overhangs to keep rain off. I don't know if you did all of that and still had problems, but that worked for us. I know a sliding door is more touchy than a hinged door, especially if the track doesn't have much extra room in it. We also have a lot of ventilation to keep humidity down in the coop, although the summers are still pretty steamy.
 

erlibrd

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Thanks for the reply. I didn't want metal because I can see it covered in frost all winter.
If the hinges are on the top of a door I could rig up a pulley somehow to open and close I think. What if the door was hinged on a side? just trying to get lots of thoughts and ideas before we cut into it....
 

teach1rusl

Love My Chickens
10 Years
Jul 28, 2009
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Floyds Knobs, Indiana
My Coop
Mine is a slider. We've use lexan. I'll bet your plywood wouldn't warp if you put your sliding door on the inside rather than the outside. Both can be opened/closed from outside the coop/run:
Main coop:

Bantam coop:
 
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erlibrd

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I reall like the looks of your sliding doors, nice and neat! What is lexan?
 

teach1rusl

Love My Chickens
10 Years
Jul 28, 2009
10,017
166
356
Floyds Knobs, Indiana
My Coop
It's like a super thick kind of plexiglass...maybe 1/4" thick. It's heavier than plexiglass though... I helped my brother do an inside mounted board pop door (slider). That was last summer, and it still slides smoothly because it's not exposed to the elements.
 

WoodlandWoman

Crowing
12 Years
May 8, 2007
5,717
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Wisconsin
We haven't had a frost problem on our metal door. Maybe our winters are drier here. The arctic air that dips down from the north to give us our coldest air is really dry. We also have a lot of adjustable ventilation for the early and late parts of winter. Our coop isn't a lot warmer or more humid than the outside air.

You could also hinge a door on it's side. Just have a way to lock it open and a way to lock it closed.
 

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