Possible reproductive issue with my Hen?

Wyorp Rock

Enabler
Sep 20, 2015
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Southern N.C. Mountains
You may have to catch her and move her away from the others when giving medication.
I have a table I stand mine on, this way I'm not struggling to hold them under one arm and balance them. They can stand, then I pull them to my body capturing, much easier for me, so something you might try (easier on the back too!)
Here's a good way to get medication into them if you have a difficult "patient".
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...er-construction-check-back-for-updates.73335/

It's good that she laid a whole egg. Hopefully things will start to become regulated. Going to the roost, she may still be unsure about using the nesting boxes. It can take time for newbies to become comfortable with their new home.
 

jeepgrrl

Songster
Feb 25, 2017
164
248
187
North Central Ohio
I'm sorry to hear your hen is having trouble. I lost one of my hens (Welsummer, 16 months old) last August due to egg peritonitis from internally laying. Chipper was never prolific egg layer; I can count on one hand the number of "normal" eggs she laid during her lifetime - I just thought she was a dud and didn't think twice about it. When she did pop out an egg, Chipper's would be weird looking (none that looked oily or shiny, but had atypical shells where the eggs were often broken) and between long intervals of no egg laying. Then the intermittent shell-less eggs started arriving last June. By mid August Chipper had started to walk about more slowly, and I could feel multiple golf-ball size eggs in her lower, swollen abdomen. During this time she continued to free range with her sisters, but moving about more gingerly. A trip to the vet only yielded an incorrect dx of being egg bound; she lived for almost a month after that diagnosis (they said I wasnt feeding her enough calcium and gave me all this literature on how to feed a chicken...really???). At any rate, I bring up Chipper's story because of some similarities to your girl, how long Chip's reproductive symptoms lasted, and the fact that her symptoms were, over time, rather subtle until she started to decline. I really hope this isn't your situation, but know there is no permanent, inexpensive treatment for internally laying. The affected hen usually ends up with egg peritonitis that causes fluid build up in her abdomen (the excess fluid makes the abdomen feel squishy). Draining the fluid can ease the discomfort and buy some time, but the hen will eventually succumb to the peritonitis if she isn't dispatched earlier. Warm Epsom soaking baths seemed to ease some of Chipper's discomfort. I watched a video on how to drain the fluid (it doesn't look too difficult, as long as the hen is calm) and would have drained Chipper's abdomen had I seen the video before she died. I have also learned that high egg producers (leghorns, RIRs, etc), especially hens/chicks purchased from a hatchery can be more prone to reproductive issues. (I did notify the hatchery where Chipper was hatched to let them know about her demise, and that maybe they need to take a look at the genetics and start anew with different breeding stock). Good luck with your hen, I really hope she recovers quickly!
 

Stockpilejoy

Songster
Jan 13, 2019
138
303
152
NC
I'm sorry to hear your hen is having trouble. I lost one of my hens (Welsummer, 16 months old) last August due to egg peritonitis from internally laying. Chipper was never prolific egg layer; I can count on one hand the number of "normal" eggs she laid during her lifetime - I just thought she was a dud and didn't think twice about it. When she did pop out an egg, Chipper's would be weird looking (none that looked oily or shiny, but had atypical shells where the eggs were often broken) and between long intervals of no egg laying. Then the intermittent shell-less eggs started arriving last June. By mid August Chipper had started to walk about more slowly, and I could feel multiple golf-ball size eggs in her lower, swollen abdomen. During this time she continued to free range with her sisters, but moving about more gingerly. A trip to the vet only yielded an incorrect dx of being egg bound; she lived for almost a month after that diagnosis (they said I wasnt feeding her enough calcium and gave me all this literature on how to feed a chicken...really???). At any rate, I bring up Chipper's story because of some similarities to your girl, how long Chip's reproductive symptoms lasted, and the fact that her symptoms were, over time, rather subtle until she started to decline. I really hope this isn't your situation, but know there is no permanent, inexpensive treatment for internally laying. The affected hen usually ends up with egg peritonitis that causes fluid build up in her abdomen (the excess fluid makes the abdomen feel squishy). Draining the fluid can ease the discomfort and buy some time, but the hen will eventually succumb to the peritonitis if she isn't dispatched earlier. Warm Epsom soaking baths seemed to ease some of Chipper's discomfort. I watched a video on how to drain the fluid (it doesn't look too difficult, as long as the hen is calm) and would have drained Chipper's abdomen had I seen the video before she died. I have also learned that high egg producers (leghorns, RIRs, etc), especially hens/chicks purchased from a hatchery can be more prone to reproductive issues. (I did notify the hatchery where Chipper was hatched to let them know about her demise, and that maybe they need to take a look at the genetics and start anew with different breeding stock). Good luck with your hen, I really hope she recovers quickly!
Thank you for sharing Chipper’s story. I realize some hens are more vulnerable to sickness and disease than others. It’s definitely more difficult treating a new hen. Ms Anne is far from tame. I’m thinking that may be due to how she was raised by previous owner. Hoping she will gain my trust soon. I am prepared for the worst but hoping for the best.
 

Stockpilejoy

Songster
Jan 13, 2019
138
303
152
NC
You may have to catch her and move her away from the others when giving medication.
I have a table I stand mine on, this way I'm not struggling to hold them under one arm and balance them. They can stand, then I pull them to my body capturing, much easier for me, so something you might try (easier on the back too!)
Here's a good way to get medication into them if you have a difficult "patient".
https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...er-construction-check-back-for-updates.73335/

It's good that she laid a whole egg. Hopefully things will start to become regulated. Going to the roost, she may still be unsure about using the nesting boxes. It can take time for newbies to become comfortable with their new home.
Thanks for the article..Very helpful tips. This morning I had early appointment and was rushed foolishly failing to close coop door when giving her meds. She is not easy to pick up since her wings seem higher up and smaller than the normal hen to me. Every time I’ve attempted to hold Ms Anne her wings slip out from underneath my hands resulting in her flapping wings slapping me in the face. Hoping her tummy feels better now and she goes back to her favorite nesting box she used first week here.
 

jeepgrrl

Songster
Feb 25, 2017
164
248
187
North Central Ohio
Thank you for sharing Chipper’s story. I realize some hens are more vulnerable to sickness and disease than others. It’s definitely more difficult treating a new hen. Ms Anne is far from tame. I’m thinking that may be due to how she was raised by previous owner. Hoping she will gain my trust soon. I am prepared for the worst but hoping for the best.
I haven't had the experience of bringing older pullets/hens into my (small) flock (yet) but I am most certain that it would be most challenging, as would be for any animal that is past the early learning stages. Hopefully the previous owner was kind to her. A few of my hens that I raised from day after hatch still won't let me pick them up without a fuss. Have you tried offering your hen mealworms? That's the one edible that all of my hens go bonkers for; maybe gain her trust via treats? Keeping my :fl for you and hoping for the best!
 

Stockpilejoy

Songster
Jan 13, 2019
138
303
152
NC
I haven't had the experience of bringing older pullets/hens into my (small) flock (yet) but I am most certain that it would be most challenging, as would be for any animal that is past the early learning stages. Hopefully the previous owner was kind to her. A few of my hens that I raised from day after hatch still won't let me pick them up without a fuss. Have you tried offering your hen mealworms? That's the one edible that all of my hens go bonkers for; maybe gain her trust via treats? Keeping my :fl for you and hoping for the best!
Thank you. Mealworms are definitely a winner. My new rooster Hansel will hold his head up high, like a gentleman, letting the girls eat blueberries and cabbage..but when there are mealworms involved he will try in get a few, after the girls have eaten some of course. They are Ms Annes favorite too. ...That's what I use to I get my flock in coop after free ranging. She starting taking them from my hand after a day of her arrival but now will only if the others are. She's a follow the leader type. When she's alone with me she becomes non-trusting and very skittish trying to get out of coop to be with the others. Probably due to me picking her up over last several days. The previous owner takes pride in his hens but uses different methods raising them. His 2 flocks live on scratch mostly with no extra oyster shell and he holds them upside down by their feet carrying them around. I suspect my adopted rooster- Hansel was originally his. When I introduced Hansel to the new hens there was no confrontation at all and they acted as if they knew each other. Hansel was the reason I got the 2 additional hens. He is so kind, gentle, and funny. If the girls use a different nesting box that he has not checked out, he will hover over them until they have laid then gets into that nesting box to check it out. When they sing after laying an egg he cackles along too...Just like them. He has definitely become my favorite.
 

Stockpilejoy

Songster
Jan 13, 2019
138
303
152
NC
Update: She did fine for several days and laid 3 normal eggs....Now she is back to laying the shell less eggs with added symptom. :( Some of the eggs are coming out as yoke separate but attached to membrane/whites. Yesterday she starting acting tired sitting at times closing eyes...and other times she'd free ranged digging for goodies. I felt she was getting ready to lay another shell less egg but never did. Today she is laying around and I'm concerned because she is shaking head repetitively from time to time. I'm not seeing any mucus. I have not separated her because she wants to be close to Hansel[Rooster]. I even attempted to free range him and isolate her in one of the coops but she frantically slid through gate to get close to him. She's now sitting at the nesting spot Hansel made in corner of small coop. Another concern: I noticed a sneeze come out of Ester and for one second I heard a wheeze but seconds later she was fine and went to go lay an egg. Not sure if its the mash feed or infection. Scared that a few of them may have or be coming down with respiratory illness..just not seeing all the symptoms. Yesterday I heard 2 sneezes but did not know who they came from since they were all at the feed water area. Could that be reason Ms Anne is laying shell less eggs? It was a lost cause last week attempting to get her to take antibiotic pill after 2 days of starting it. Never had issues giving meds to flock I raised from chicks. All droppings from last night looked normal. Called around to see what type antibiotic I could get local that can be added to water. With the new hens being so hard to catch I'm trying to avoid traumatizing them while trying to get a pill down. I have oxytetracycline Hydrochloride but it is several years old. Not sure how old it is since It appears I cut that portion off. Since no one local has that or Baytril on hand I went ahead and added 1 teaspoon to gallon and will give for 5 days. I'd rather treat all prematurely in order to save one or two hens. Don't think it's coccidiosis since month back I put corid in their water for 5 days. I felt the new hens may not have built up immunity plus they are not use to free ranging in wet dirt with piled leave. Sorry for the long rabbling post. Hen + Sickness = High Anxiety :barnie
 
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