Possibly sick chicken, how about antibiotics?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Neilette, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. Neilette

    Neilette Songster

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    I don't know why I imagined this chicken-business would be easier. [​IMG]

    My 15 week old Australorp pullet has been getting progressively more lethargic. She doesn't show any other symptoms, palpitated her, poop looks good, I checked and she's not egg bound; but she's clearly not feeling well. She got the ill-chicken-look . It's gotten so concerning that I'm considering treating her with antibiotics even without a diagnosis. I have Sulfadimethoxine. They were all treated for coccidiosis with 6 days of 0.05% Sulfadimethoxine in their water a couple weeks ago. ETA: Everybody else looks great, except that I have a crowing pullet who I might also treat because she doesn't look great (but it could just be hormones?).

    What do you all think of treating her with Sulfa as an antibiotic to clear this thing up?

    ETA: The Sulfa drug I have is Sulfadimethoxine a.k.a Albon.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2010

  2. ultasol

    ultasol Songster

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    coccidiosis can come back, if the bird hasn't gained immunity. Use Corid (or anything active ingredient amprollium, but medicated feed isn't a curative dosage) as it is MUCH easier on their systems. Sulmet can cause liver/internal damage if used for longer than proposed or if even MILDLY overdosed... whereas amprollium has a much larger margin of safety.
     
  3. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    It is possible that that one single hen has acquired a secondary bacterial infection while her immune system was depressed by the coccidiosis. In addition to the Corrid, you might treat her individually with a broad spectrum antibiotic (like Terramycin, which is oxytetracycline). Cocci can be really hard on their systems and the course of treatment with sulfa or other antibiotics can deplete the good bacteria in their gut right along with killing the bad bugs. She might benefit from the addition of yogurt or other pro-biotics added to her diet after treatment. Also, make sure that she is getting sufficient calcium. One way to do that is to sprinkle oyster shell on her food rather than just leaving it available as a free choice.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2010
    Saaniya likes this.
  4. Neilette

    Neilette Songster

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    Thank you for your advice. If cocci can come back for a second round, then that's probably what this looks like. They will begin their antibiotic treatment today. I will give them daily a mix of mash, yogurt, and organic ACV (with live Mother in it!) to help their gut.

    ETA: I have Sulfadimethoxine, which is "Albon". How does Albon compare? When I first suspected cocci, I did an internet search and Albon was the top brand I could get my hands on in a hurry. And it's supposed to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic, the internet tells me. Sulmet is Sodium Sulfamethazine, yes? Am I wrong? Pharmaceuticals make my head spin. [​IMG]

    wikipedia: Sulfadimethoxine
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2010
  5. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    Albon and Sulmet are same-same so far as the basic chemical makeup. It is considered a broad spectrum sulfa-based antibiotic and it is used to treat things like cocciodisis, infectious coryza, acute fowl cholera, and pullorum disease (among others). Are you putting the Albon in the drinking water or directly into the mouth? If into the drinking water, only mix as much solution as you think your bird(s) will consume in a single day, otherwise she/they will not get a full strength dosage needed to kill the coccidia. This often accounts for the reason a single course of treatment is ineffective and needs to be repeated. I wouldn't resort to any of the other antibotics until after you've treated for coccidia the second time and, then, only if you're seeing no improvement. Let us know how this goes for you.
     

  6. Neilette

    Neilette Songster

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    Quote:Ah.

    Into their mouths, wha? It's going into their drinking water at 0.05%. I'm a follower of written directions, so, according to the package, I do and have mix(ed) a new batch every day. I did get a syringe and squirt about 10 cc of the 0.05% medicated drinking water into their mouths to get them started: I'm worried that the Australorp is so far gone she's going to dehydrate herself, and hopefully a little hydration/medication will start her off to feeling well enough to feed herself normally. I was careful not to asphyxiate them -- which made the project that much harder. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2010
  7. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    Albon is also available in the oral suspension. Wasn't sure which formulation you were using. You seem to have a handle on what you're doing. Let us know how the Australorp gets along.
     
  8. Neilette

    Neilette Songster

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    Ooh, okay. Thanks, I will.
     
  9. Neilette

    Neilette Songster

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    Apr 18, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    I'm happy to report today that both chickens are off of medication and as perky as... er... spring chickens. The Australorp felt feisty enough to challenge the cockerel! And -- miracle of miracles -- the BR crowing pullet hasn't crowed! They're all in the yard with the rest of the flock scratching around in the grass and chasing bugs. Thank you all for your helpful advice and moral support. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2010

  10. MotherJean

    MotherJean Songster

    Excellent news. So nice to hear about the successes. It makes the occasional tales of heartbreak much easier to bear. Congrats.
     

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