Prevention dose of corid for chicks

Pampered chicken girl

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Apr 10, 2022
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I am wanting to add corid to the waters of my babies next time instead of using medicated feed. What is the prevention dose for babies? I know the adult dose is ½ teaspoon to 1 gallon water but it would be less for babies right?
PS don't all of you be asking me why I don't just use medicated chick starter. I have a certain brand I want and it's not medicated.
 
How old are your chicks? Have they been exposed to the outside? An understanding of how amprolium works is what is needed here. Amprolium works by suppressing a B vitamin that coccidia need to survive. That reduces the load of the parasite enough to allow the chick's body to build up a natural resistance to coccidia in their environment. It is not a "preventative" if the chick has not been exposed to coccidia. Many people raising chicks will bring in small chunks of their grass and soil to put in the brooder so the chicks can start building natural resistance. You can also take them outside for a few hours on nice days to expose them. Medicated feed is just a lower dose of amprolium than Corid. If you do not feed medicated food, and are exposing the to outside soil, just add Corid to their water per direction. If they have not been exposed to the out side, you would want to wait until they are.
 
Its going to depend upon the concentration of Aprolium in the solution you have, and its VERY small - how small depends of course on how concentrated. This is a case for quite accurate measurements.

and as Townchicks says above, if your birds haven't been exposed, it will provide no benefit.
My preference (understanding, I have not had a case of severe coccidia outbreak on my grounds) is to raise my chicks in a brooder box till 7-10 days, provide them limited access to grounds over the next two weeks in areas where individuals of the main flock occasionally wanders thru but do not remain, i.e. the "wrong" ide of the elctric fence), then I move them out to the grow out pen where they are surrounded by - but not (mostly*) in contact with - the adult flock until about 8-9 weeks of age.

That helps expose them to the local parasites in a controlled fashion.

* a few of my hens would scale 6' of poultry wire to get into the grow out run and steal the babies' feed. The new electric fencing has (almost entirely) stopped that.

Further caveat - SOME of the feed (the layer mix) I get from the local mill which I use in my mix for my adult birds has amprolium. Sometimes all of it does. You take what you can get.
 
Its going to depend upon the concentration of Aprolium in the solution you have, and its VERY small - how small depends of course on how concentrated. This is a case for quite accurate measurements.

and as Townchicks says above, if your birds haven't been exposed, it will provide no benefit.
My preference (understanding, I have not had a case of severe coccidia outbreak on my grounds) is to raise my chicks in a brooder box till 7-10 days, provide them limited access to grounds over the next two weeks in areas where individuals of the main flock occasionally wanders thru but do not remain, i.e. the "wrong" ide of the elctric fence), then I move them out to the grow out pen where they are surrounded by - but not (mostly*) in contact with - the adult flock until about 8-9 weeks of age.

That helps expose them to the local parasites in a controlled fashion.

* a few of my hens would scale 6' of poultry wire to get into the grow out run and steal the babies' feed. The new electric fencing has (almost entirely) stopped that.

Further caveat - SOME of the feed (the layer mix) I get from the local mill which I use in my mix for my adult birds has amprolium. Sometimes all of it does. You take what you can get.
The concentration is 9.6%
 
Its going to depend upon the concentration of Aprolium in the solution you have, and its VERY small - how small depends of course on how concentrated. This is a case for quite accurate measurements.

and as Townchicks says above, if your birds haven't been exposed, it will provide no benefit.
My preference (understanding, I have not had a case of severe coccidia outbreak on my grounds) is to raise my chicks in a brooder box till 7-10 days, provide them limited access to grounds over the next two weeks in areas where individuals of the main flock occasionally wanders thru but do not remain, i.e. the "wrong" ide of the elctric fence), then I move them out to the grow out pen where they are surrounded by - but not (mostly*) in contact with - the adult flock until about 8-9 weeks of age.

That helps expose them to the local parasites in a controlled fashion.

* a few of my hens would scale 6' of poultry wire to get into the grow out run and steal the babies' feed. The new electric fencing has (almost entirely) stopped that.

Further caveat - SOME of the feed (the layer mix) I get from the local mill which I use in my mix for my adult birds has amprolium. Sometimes all of it does. You take what you can get.
I have had a coccidiosis outbreak in my flock thats why I want them to have the before and and a few weeks after they co.e outside. I usually keep them inside for 4.5-5 weeks then move them to the grow out coop till they are 18-20 weeks as I have quite a few big hens who would crush the Littles
 
Another thing is that if I use medicated feed or corid will that prevent my chicks from gaining some kind of immunity to it and when I take them off they will be more likely to get coccidiosis then if I just didn't use amprolium? 🤔 I want to make sure they get the best start in life.
 

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