Problem: i put the cart before the horse....

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by farmgirl44, Dec 17, 2012.

  1. farmgirl44

    farmgirl44 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i ordered eggs and then the incubator. bad news, eggs arrived today and incubator just shipped today.

    i unpacked the eggs and have them setting upright in a carton at room temperature. what should i do with the eggs until the incubator gets here???
     
  2. dickhorstman

    dickhorstman Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

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    Some people turn the eggs daily in storage. The easiest way to do that is to tip the entire carton one way today and the other way tomorrow.
     
  3. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    When are you expecting the incubator? Eggs can be up to 10 days old and still hatch out fine, after 10 days their odds drop a bit. Just keep them at room temp and turn them daily.
     
  4. farmgirl44

    farmgirl44 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 15, 2012
    they shipped today, so 5 days or so.

    i'll turn them tonight.

    thanks!!!
     
  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Poultry: Reproduction & Incubation Hatching egg storage period
    Eggs saved for hatching are very perishable and their viability is greatly affected by the quality of storage conditions. If properly stored, the number of hatching failures can be kept to a minimum. It is recommended that most eggs be stored no longer than 1 week. Storing eggs longer will produce a greater incidence of hatching failures.
    The maximum storage period for chickens is about 3 weeks. Some turkey eggs will survive for 4 weeks, but quail will have difficulty developing from eggs stored longer than 2 weeks.
    Hatching eggs should be collected soon after lay and maintained at 50-65o F. The eggs must not warm to above 65o F. unless they are being prepared for immediate incubation. Relative humidity in the storage facility should be maintained at 70 percent and daily egg turning or repositioning is recommended to prevent the yolk from sticking to the inside surface of the shell.
    Refer to one of the incubation related publications listed previously for a more thorough discussion on hatching egg storage.
     

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