Processing Day Support Group ~ HELP us through the Emotions PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Sally Sunshine, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. AQHAchick22

    AQHAchick22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dropped off 4 of my roosters this morning to be processed (there was no way I could do it myself) and I've been in tears all morning...As much as I'm looking forward to some homegrown chicken meat the dropping them off part was horrible. I feel terrible and wish I just turned the truck around once I got there...
     
  2. cleansquared

    cleansquared Chillin' With My Peeps

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    moline ks
    Glad to know that i read that on the incubating pages here on byc.....
     
  3. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    They can be processed at any age, just depends on how much meat is worth your while. Doing it by or before first crow attempts will mean a smaller amount of meat. I live in town and have EE too. I process my slips by the crow (I can have boys and have my breeders but do not want any additional crowing). I skin rather then pluck and don't eat organ meat. So when I finish I have neck, back, wings, legs, thighs, and breast and usually end up w/ around 3ish lbs of meat give or take some ounces.
     
  4. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    Are you doing it yourself or taking to a processer?

    The first ones are hard, it does get easier (not any more pleasant but easier). We are our own worst enemy in our heads, overthinking it.
     
  5. dutchbunny83

    dutchbunny83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have always heard it takes about a year to get standard breeds up to the size of processing. We live in the city too and have always had to give our roo's away. We have some freedom rangers now that get processed at 11 weeks. They are 7 and looks like 3 are roo's. Hoping they can make it the rest of the way without crowing or they will have to go early!
     
  6. dutchbunny83

    dutchbunny83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 11, 2012
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    I'm doing it myself.
    I don't even know that there is a processor around here, but it seems like it would add a bunch of unncessary stress on the birds to move them to a strange place before killing them.
    Plus one of my main reasons in doing it is I know exactly how it is processed and cared for unlike buying it somewhere (though at least I'd know what it had eaten and how it lived).
    Seems like it wouldn't be worth the cost either, I'd assume it's pretty expensive.
    We only have 12 so it's not like I have 200.
    We live in the city too.
    I watched a bunch of youtube videos.

    From what I've seen, I feel the best way to kill them is chop off the heads. Anyone have opinions on that?
    Wringing the neck doesn't always cause them to die instantly I've heard and is probably scary. My husband was deployed with the Army and I had some birds get sick and need to be culled. I built a killing cone and slit her throat, but it was HORRIBLE!!!!!! She was my pet, she took forever to bleed out, and it was a good 3 minutes she sat there looking at me until she was finally dead. Worst. Day. Ever. I sobbed hysterically the whole time I buried her and banned my family from eating any meat. (Then a month into our soy based vegan food I became enlightened to all soy being GMO and how much worse that is for my kids, so now we're back here attempting to raise our own)

    Anyway, any tips appreciated!!!
     
  7. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    I tried both slicing w/ a killing cone and chopping w/ a hatchet HATED both, never tried clubbing or wringing, wouldn't be able to bring myself to those, also never tried broomstick, but would try those long before clubbing or wringing. I do not have good enough aim for the hatchet. I do killing cone and pellet gun, it works for me. Doing it w/ a buddy helps if that is possible (wasn't for me, but would have been a great help) a glass of wine (or two) doesn't hurt. The killing needs to be quick and decisive but after that give yourself time. After the killing act whatever it is , before the death tremors start walk away, meditate, sing a song, pray, drink your wine, whatever it takes. Especially when you first start those death tremors no matter how often you tell yourself are involuntary reactions get you every time! The first few you will have to FORCE yourself seriously, keep at it, it does get better.
     
  8. dutchbunny83

    dutchbunny83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, thank you!
    Fortunately my husband will be here this time and he is responsible for all the actual killing (though if we do the hatchet I will be responsible for holding them down).
    And I will be doing the plucking and cleaning (mostly because I don't trust him to do the cleaning part right!)
    But I still anticipate it being very upsetting since I've already gotten so close to them and I don't want to be a part of an animal dying whether I'm physically using the weapon or not.

    Thanks for your advice!
     
  9. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    Your welcome.

    You do know about putting two nails in the chopping surface to kinda hold the head while you hold the body?
     
  10. jajeanpierre

    jajeanpierre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think that one-year time frame is incorrect. I spoke to the breeder of my Ameraucanas. These were bred for exhibition. He said they were perfect at 5 months. I just processed my first bird, a Silkie cockerel that was 5.5 months. There was a lot more meat on the bird than I thought there would be. I've had a really hot summer, with 30 or 40 days over 100F, so getting weight on them has been a challenge.
     

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