Processing Day Support Group ~ HELP us through the Emotions PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Sally Sunshine, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. Chambertin

    Chambertin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Silkies require a good sharp knife. The typical kitchen knife isn't very sharp (at least not at my mom's or brother's house).
    I spread the outside feathers best as possible then hold them down with my thumb that gives a clear path as best you can for the knife.
    Then take the best sharp knife you can (we have a specific knife for fish and chicken processing) and put it against your thumb.

    Use your index finger to catch the weight of the blade and cut clean and long. Think as if you have a sword or a golf club and one even motion pull down and into the neck and fluff.
    If you have a godo knife you wont need to do anything but pull, the knife will do the cuting work. A knife with a little distance is best because it gives more time for the knife wo work down to the bone.

    I think a really good knife and a solid cut is better for the animal because when you get a good sharp cut you might not even realize you are cut until you see the blood. Sure you know something touched you, but no idea it was a cut.

    I took a couple pictures using a pen as a stand in for the neck.

    Prep & hold the feathers back while pushing the index finger forward to support the incoming knife.
    [​IMG]

    Get the knife and do it firmly and quickly, a good knife will cut through the fluff.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. jajeanpierre

    jajeanpierre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks. I thought I had a proper knife, but when I tried to "practice" on a dead baby squirrel whose nest had been knocked down by the tree pruners (long story--saved 4 out of 5 and those 4 were reunited with mom, fed and warm, the next morning), it didn't slice through the skin the way I expected it to. A hunter gave me the name of the knife I should buy--I've been putting it off. Tomorrow I'll go buy the knife. As I said, I've been putting it off every stop of the way. Unfortunately, I had to do it last night.

    My problem was I had a Silkie that had a beard and a muff AND was growing a lot of pin feathers around the neck and face. It wasn't awful, but it wasn't ideal.

    Now, how do I cook this rather small , skinned Silkie who was 5.5 months old at slaughter?
     
  3. Chambertin

    Chambertin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What I usually do is quarter them.
    The heavier meat pieces and make up stir fry or BBQ. (I trim the meat off and save the bones)
    Smaller pieces and bones go into flavor soups. I will pick the meat off and put it back in, doggies get the bones.

    Without the skin I have no idea how it would roast but I am very intrigued and will try it later.
    I'm guessing it would be just as nice, because a pork roast or brisket has no skin.
    However I wouldn't want you to take the hit of a very dry chicken.

    Earlier you asked when you can cook them. I say once they have been bled out and processed they are ready.
    Yet if you brine them any kind of poultry is SO much better.
    So the best I know of is to brine for about 3 hours (or until thawed) after processing for cooking or while recovering from freezer camp.
    Dont bother brineing before freezer camp as all that extra water will encourage more ice crystals and more freezer burn.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
  4. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Henryetta
    Cook them upside down and cover the pot, or cook in plastic cooking bag.
     
  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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    [​IMG]
     
  6. dutchbunny83

    dutchbunny83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *Sigh*

    With all the disgusting GMO corn being pumped into these frankenbird broilers and the factory farm processing of chickens and washing them in ammonia before selling them, I decided there is no way I can feed that garbage to my kids.

    So I sucked it up and after many, many years of being vegetarian I bought my family some meat birds. I couldn't wait the full 8 months to a year for heritage breeds, but didn't want the cornish cross freakish birds either, so we went with Freedom Rangers. They are so beautiful and unfortunately a lot of them have more personality than our "pet" chickens we raised from chicks for eggs.

    They only have a few weeks left until they meet their demise, and I am having overwhelming anxiety about it. I mean, I always knew we were getting them for meat. And I know it's what is best. But it just sucks. A lot! I guess I never really thought about how hard it was going to be, and I really don't know how I can go through with this!

    [​IMG]
     
  7. cleansquared

    cleansquared Chillin' With My Peeps

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    moline ks

    ive heard that too high of temps in the incubator kill girls before boys if you have a consistantly way high number of boys you might try backing down temp..
     
  8. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    [​IMG] You have made good decision!

    We are her to help.
     
  9. cleansquared

    cleansquared Chillin' With My Peeps

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    moline ks
    Does any one know at what age easter egger roos could process i have 2 and i live in the city and am not supposed to have roos also is there any one here in kansas that would process them for me? My boyfriend is a vegaterian and i could not kill them here he would have a cow!
     
  10. ronott1

    ronott1 Daily Digest Guru Premium Member Project Manager

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    The hens determine Gender. The incubator killing one over the other is related to lizards or frogs determining gender base on heat of incubation. It does not work like that with chickens.
     

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