Production reds or Rhode island reds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Pet Duck Boy, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. Pet Duck Boy

    Pet Duck Boy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 12, 2009
    Orlando, FL
    Which do you prefer and why? I currently have three 20 week old PR pullets and so far I'm in love with them. They aren't big, which is a good thing since I have a small yard and I'm not looking for meat birds, and they supposedly lay a tad better than pure RIRs. Mine are as tame as can be, though one is a little harder to catch than the other 2 it's nothing serious. And once on my lap all 3 will beg for a head rub. One began laying 3 weeks ago, and has done remarkably well and laid 8 days in a row, and is just now taking a break tonight. Another one looks to be ready, and should lay in the next few days. I'm just wondering if anyone has good or bad opinions or experiences with either of the types.
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    I do prefer a production red, and I'll tell you why: I've got a RIR hen, and she's a doll, but she lays a small brown egg. I'd say her egg isn't quite medium. Almost though. My two production reds lay a really large egg nearly every day, and they're about a year and a half now. They are great little layers. Now, size wize, they're pretty much the same size as my RIR. They also have real sweet personalities. You really want a smaller chicken if you're interested in eggs.....they eat less.

    So the production reds lay a bigger egg. I'd say they do both lay almost every day faithfully though. I guess for me it's egg size.
     
  3. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    It's sort of like comparing apples & oranges. Both are good but very different.
    One is bred to produce a maximum number of eggs. If that's your goal then production Reds are the right choice.
    Standard bred Reds are bred for appearance & to preserve a bird with historical importance. If these things are important to you then these are the birds for you.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  4. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:I agree 100% about the comparing apples to oranges thing. Its going to depend on the persons needs/intentions for their flocks. Personally I prefer the Heritage RIRs because I hate to see the quality and history that is being diminished by the production strains.
     
  5. pennie1

    pennie1 Redneck Silkie

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    I like both and think that there is a need on both ends of the scale.
    If it's eggs you want, definitely PR's. They are awesome layers of very large eggs. Mine lay right through our bitter winters without a slow down. I even have a broody setting on 7 eggs. The PR's are very hardy.

    The RIR's are beautiful birds and their history should be guarded and preserved at all costs.
     
  6. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:I very much agree with what NYNEDS had to say.

    The thing that you have to keep in mind is that you will not get a good Standard bred Red from a hatchery. You will need to find a breeder. So if you are wanting to preserve the appearance and history of the Reds you will want to stay away from hatchery stock because they come nowhere close to what a good bred Red should look like.

    Chris
     
  7. Pet Duck Boy

    Pet Duck Boy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 12, 2009
    Orlando, FL
    Got another egg from my first layer, and this time it's 3/4ths of the size of a large store bought egg, much bigger than it was 2 weeks ago. And I'm happy to report that a second PR is in the nesting box throwing shavings on her back! It's about time as she's been freaking out the past day. And I would LOVE a pure RIR, but finding a breeder here outside of Orlando would prove to be difficult, as I'm not even aloud chickens in my area. Getting eggs shipped is out of the question too.
     

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