Protein in eggs - Dietitian? / diet question?

NHMountainMan

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A few years back I read about a guy that was trying to start a business of selling eggs enhanced by what the chickens ate. I can't remember the details, maybe giving them an oregano flavor by feeding them oregano. He was trying to flavor them. He was also trying to increase certain nutrients like they do with Omega's. One thing I specifically remember was calcium. He was trying to increase the calcium content of the eggs but it did not work, the shells got real hard though. The article did not mention the damage the extra calcium could do to their internal organs. I tried searching for it and could not find that article.

I think you'd run into the same issue with protein. You would not get a higher percent protein per gram of egg, you'd get larger eggs. A larger egg will have more of everything, protein, fats, iron, and everything else an egg provides but that's just because the egg is bigger.

Good luck on resolving your issues.
I knew one of the experts I follow would remember something about tests or trials of other chicken owners. I suspect you're right - adding protein might alter the egg size and overall calories. But I've gotten a few really good ideas. And thank you - I believe my issues are resolved - I'm just trying to regain range of motion, and muscle mass, which is tougher for older men (yup -- man-o-pause...)
 

FortCluck

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I knew one of the experts I follow would remember something about tests or trials of other chicken owners. I suspect you're right - adding protein might alter the egg size and overall calories. But I've gotten a few really good ideas. And thank you - I believe my issues are resolved - I'm just trying to regain range of motion, and muscle mass, which is tougher for older men (yup -- man-o-pause...)
:lau man-o-pause... That's hilarious
 

NHMountainMan

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I don't know if you already thought of this, but you could try eating more egg WHITES and giving the yolks to someone else (family, dog, chickens). The fat and iron are mostly in the yolks, while more than half of the protein is in the white. So you'd be getting more protein relative to the amount of calories and iron, which seems to be the current goal.

A google search turns up the following info:
egg white (33 grams)= 17 calories, 3.6 grams protein, no iron
egg yolk (17 grams)= 55 calories, 2.7 grams protein, .5 mg iron

I'm not saying egg yolks are bad, just that adding some extra whites to your diet may be easier than changing the diet of the hens in this case.
You are right on! I do eat more egg whites to get more protein without the fat - and the dog gets some of the yolks (and a really shiny coat!) Thank you for taking the time to lay out the macronutrients !
 

NHMountainMan

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I just added ducks to my flock, 3 Pekins and 1 Muscovy. I have three females and one male. I'm going to keep these in my layer flock and their offspring will be meat ducks... It's basically the same thing I am doing with my layer flock of chickens.

Plant-based protein does have a lot less calories, but I feel so much better eating those since I have reactions to most meat. So far chicken is the only meat I can eat without getting sick.

Duck eggs are richer and creamier according to my husband (I haven't tried them because I chickened out last time I made them). They are a lot bigger too so they keep you fuller longer. They are good to use for baking too, they add a richness to the baked goods. Duck eggs can't be overcooked because they turn rubbery. We like to make them runny, I guess over easy is what you would call it.
I'm going to need to try out some duck eggs. And read a lot more about the needs of owning some ducks of my own. You've really got me thinking differently about my plans for next year.

This year every chicken was a "dual purpose" breed - and there is just enough meat on them (processed at 24 weeks) for a meal for the wife and I. With my increased need for proteins - I'll need to add more protein to every meal - so meat birds are coming.

I'm planning on trying Cornish X, rangers, and possibly Breese in adjacent flocks, with hopes of a self sustaining flock. I got great advice on this from @Ridgerunner a few months back. I've got tractors built and ready for next spring, with some carver moving into a new coop (or two - depending on how I manage the flocks / results (before getting ill and retiring, I was an economist... I love measuring and tests, its ingrained in my DNA)

I hadn't thought at all about ducks, quail, turkey, and now I'm even just wondering about guineas, etc to take a look at that protein possibilities.

This is what I love about this community of strangers, willing to offer advice, with positivity.
 

NHMountainMan

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I'm glad that you live in the area that you do and can receive the medical help that you need! It frustrates me to no end that some hospitals cannot provide the medical needs that people need.
I couldn't agree more - We are so blessed to be here. Some of the best Drs and research institutes in the world are within a relatively short drive. Truthfully - not sure I'd be here if I didn't live so near world class medical care.
 

NNYchick

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I am not a doctor or a dietitian but 300 grams a day seems like a lot. An elite athlete aims for 100 grams a day, your body can only metabolize a given amount at a time then it is execrated by the kidneys. It wouldn't hurt to just double check the numbers with your dietitian.
 

NHMountainMan

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I am not a doctor or a dietitian but 300 grams a day seems like a lot. An elite athlete aims for 100 grams a day, your body can only metabolize a given amount at a time then it is execrated by the kidneys. It wouldn't hurt to just double check the numbers with your dietitian.
Thank you for your response and advice. And you are correct - high protein diets can be tough on the kidneys. They've got me drinking 12-16 cups (about a gallon) of water every day to help flush the kidneys. I get blood / labs worked up every month, as I need to have blood removed (1-2 pts) to remove iron - and get a kidney work up each time.

The macronutrient mix was designed by a dietitian. Elite athletes already have muscle mass, and are eating to maintain muscle and carbs to provide energy. I'm on more of a bodybuilder type diet. I'm just trying to replace protein powder with real food.

But thank you and I really appreciate the advice and concern. I find this community so helpful!
 

NNYchick

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Thank you for your response and advice. And you are correct - high protein diets can be tough on the kidneys. They've got me drinking 12-16 cups (about a gallon) of water every day to help flush the kidneys. I get blood / labs worked up every month, as I need to have blood removed (1-2 pts) to remove iron - and get a kidney work up each time.

The macronutrient mix was designed by a dietitian. Elite athletes already have muscle mass, and are eating to maintain muscle and carbs to provide energy. I'm on more of a bodybuilder type diet. I'm just trying to replace protein powder with real food.

But thank you and I really appreciate the advice and concern. I find this community so helpful!
Oh good they are following you closely. Good luck with your recovery and congratulations on your remission.
 
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