puncture wound after predator attack

Amandawhite

In the Brooder
Apr 2, 2020
8
21
18
Virginia
Two nights ago something got into our coop and killed one of our chickens. I later noticed that another one seemed injured. I took a look today and she has a significant puncture wound under her wing, in the thigh area. I'm planning to go separate her once I get my kids to bed. She is about 7 months old. She is limping and very lethargic. I'm wondering if we should just put her down, or try to help her heal. She doesn't seem to be bleeding. I have no clue if there are internal injuries. She slept in the run last night because she couldn't get up the ramp to the coop. With either option, do yall have any suggestions? How best to put her down or home care suggestions.
Thanks in advance!
 

Isaac 0

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I agree, with azygous. You'd be surprised how fast bacteria can multiply and infect a surface. Most bacteria I do cultures, and sensitivities on, have covered the whole plate in as little as twelve hours. Of course, there are a ton of other factors at play, but it gives you an idea.

My first suggestion would be moving her inside into a warm dimly lit area with feed and water provided. You can try offering her soupy feed often, or try dripping an electrolyte along her beak. If you can't get fish mox, or it doesn't come until a few days, it may be worth to stop by TSC, and administer injectable Penncilin G. While it's not the best antibiotic, since it's lost its effectiveness in several bacteria, the most important being staphylococcus aureus, which is common bacteria on the skin. It would be better than nothing if you can't get an antibiotic to your house soon.

You can find Pen G here,

https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/durvet-pen-aqueous-100-ml
 

Isaac 0

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How much do I give to the chicken? I noticed both of these say they are not for chickens
"Intended" for Cattle, and sheep, swine, and horses, but we use it sometimes in poultry.

You will find different dosages, but in Plumb's veterinary handbook, and in clinical avian medicine, the chicken dose is 100mg/kg IM once a day or every two days. Since Pen G is in IU not mg, you have to convert it to MG, so ,

Every, ML of the Pen G you have contains around 297mg,

So, per pound of weight you would give 0.15ml of the Pen G into the best tissue, once a day, or every two days.

If you're not familiar with administering IM, you'll need a few 22 gauge needles from the feed store, and some syringes.

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https://www.shagbarkbantams.com/using-injectable-medications/
https://lafeber.com/vet/intramuscul...r IM injections in,for IM injections in birds.
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
Dec 11, 2009
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We're very lucky to have @Isaac 0 in our BYC ranks.

Antibiotics target the cells of bacteria and bacteria target different higher life forms, including humans. Therefore, an antibiotic useful for fighting infection in a human or a pigeon or a fish or a cow or a pig can also work for a chicken.

I'm always busy, too much on my agenda, so I just pop a whole 250mg amoxicillin capsule into my chicken patient once a day, and this lazy approach has always worked okay. I do consent to dividing the dose in half for a very small chicken.

But @Isaac 0 's dosing calculations are more precise and better.
 

Amandawhite

In the Brooder
Apr 2, 2020
8
21
18
Virginia
Thank you all for your tips! So an update, I'm completely shocked that this chicken survived. I had basically given up. I did get the penicillin from tractor supply. Gave her a couple doses. It quickly helped the green skin go away. I didn't expect her skin directly under her wing to close back up but it did!! And she started putting weight back on her foot about a week after the accident. We got this really cool tent so she can be outside during the day while she continues to heal. I'll probably use this tent more with the other chickens later so they can have safe "pasture" time during the day!
 

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Isaac 0

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Jul 19, 2016
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Iowa
Thank you all for your tips! So an update, I'm completely shocked that this chicken survived. I had basically given up. I did get the penicillin from tractor supply. Gave her a couple doses. It quickly helped the green skin go away. I didn't expect her skin directly under her wing to close back up but it did!! And she started putting weight back on her foot about a week after the accident. We got this really cool tent so she can be outside during the day while she continues to heal. I'll probably use this tent more with the other chickens later so they can have safe "pasture" time during the day!
The green coloration you saw, was likely bruising, but I'm glad to hear she's doing better.
 

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