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Question about Dorking Chickens

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by blessedacre, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. blessedacre

    blessedacre Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 30, 2012
    Fl Panhandle
    I am wanting to start raising a small backyard flock of chickens, this is my first attempt at chickens. I am interested in the Dorking because it has a great temperment, dual purpose bird (with great meat) and I am wanting both eggs and table meat. I have read that the Dorking does not reach maturity for 2 yrs. What exactly does this mean? Will they not lay eggs for almost 2 yrs or does this mean you can wait until they are between 1 yr - 1 1/2 yrs old to process them and still have a roasting bird verses a crock pot bird. I do want to keep my breed pure, but I am also alittle worried about the broodiness of the breed. I can only house 10-13 birds. I thought that I might get a few (3) hens of another breed to supply us with eggs when the Dorkings are not laying (apparently they do not lay when they "go broody" ?). I would like the alternative breed to lay brown eggs so I can keep them seperate from the Dorking eggs. Is this something that will work in reality or only in theory? Also is there a breed you would recommend for this supplimental purpose, that will get along with the docile Dorking? Could you recommend a reputable hatchery. Thank you so much for your time.

    Blessings
     
  2. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 14, 2011
    Central Oregon
    You can get one of the hybrids that are designed to lay like the dickens and lay brown eggs. Have no roosters except your purebred Dorking. Eat all the brown eggs and only hatch the white Dorking eggs.

    It they mature at 2 years, that is when they are fully grown and have their adult plumage and color. You really should know what you've got by about 6-7 months, but they will continue to fill out a bit. Plumage might mature a bit. I'm guessing, but you'd probably butcher the roosters somewhere between 5-6 months.
     
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