Question for the experienced folks

NMbirds

Songster
11 Years
Aug 17, 2008
261
1
119
Abiquiu, New Mexico
I am trying to decide between a fixed, permanent site coop and a movable one. I want a dozen or so chickens, space is not an issue but essentials are the usual, access to nestiing boxes from outside, predator proof (we have most of them) and place to store feed inside. Have ideas for ventilation, lighting, all the rest and have the materials. Will start building this winter for Spring (June) move in. I know each has its respective advantages/disadvantages but eager to know your thoughts and experiences. Thanks in advance!
 

newchickmom

Songster
12 Years
Nov 8, 2007
720
11
184
Lafayette, Indiana
I prefer a permenant coop. Mine is big enough to walk in (8 X 16) and has plenty of room for the girls even when they have to be shut in. I also have an atached run and allow free-ranging outsid the run when I am out there in the evenings.
I don't want to stand out in the cold or wet to collect eggs or feed and water them.
 

WoodlandWoman

Crowing
12 Years
May 8, 2007
5,717
65
283
Wisconsin
I think the more chickens you want to house, the tougher it is to use a tractor, because of space requirements. If you have flat property and machinery to move a large tractor, you can go larger, easier. If you are moving one by hand, they work best for smaller numbers of chickens.

If you are talking a dozen or more, then I think a permanent coop and run might be a better way to go. It will also give you the storage area you're looking for.
 

Anny

Songster
11 Years
Apr 24, 2008
1,466
10
181
Detroit Michigan
my favorite idea is always the "pad lock" design a stationary coop with 2 or more "run" attached you rotate which run you allow the hens in. This allows you to grow a garden in one of the pad locks if you choose. Or allows you to keep grass in the run! I hope to do this if I ever move to larger piece of land.
 

bills

Songster
12 Years
Jan 4, 2008
475
6
141
vancouver island
Anny's idea is a great one, and can work very well. The rotation of the runs around the coop, annually is ideal if you have the room to do it.

Since you are in the early planning stages, it would be simple for you to build a coop in a place in the yard where you can do this. Don't forget to add extra chicken doors on the sides where the rotational runs will be placed.

I like the added advantage of building a permanent coop, as you can put the extra effort into predator proofing it. Burying the hardware cloth, closing in the foundation area to prevent rats, etc..

JMHO
 

scooter147

Songster
11 Years
Jul 30, 2008
2,042
72
221
Missouri
I think in the long run you will be happier with a permenant coop.


The rotational run idea is a great one if you have the space and money to do so.
 

WestKnollAmy

The Crazy Chicken Lady
11 Years
Apr 22, 2008
10,061
266
381
upstate SC
If it is only a dz or so chickens I would go with permanent.
The only reason we have tractors is to separate the breeds to get more chicks and with all the land it makes it easy to put a tractor in different paddocks and pastures and let them free range from those. We have several permanent coops and that is much easier to deal with all together than the tractors.
 

mikefromnh

In the Brooder
11 Years
Aug 25, 2008
39
0
22
I have a six hens and went with a moveable coop on skids. It is heavier than I thought it would be but my small (22hp) tractor moves it without a problem. I like being able to move the girls when one area is gets too trampled. I plan to move it into my garden soon so that they can help fertilize and till


 

silkiechicken

Staff PhD
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
13 Years
Jan 25, 2007
21,494
968
393
Everett WA/Corvallis OR
I'd love a perminant coop for my layers but everyone is in a trctory style coop. The layers are in a 8x8x5, with removable 8x8x 5 trangle top so rain doesnt fallin anymore tractor that takes 3 to move. Meat birds though, I'd neve want to keep those in a perminant coop. Much eaiser to move those from garden spot to garden spot. However, I free range, so it doesn't always make that big of a difference. They are much earlier risers than the humans so do wear down the inside of the tractor before they are let out in th emorning.
 

NMbirds

Songster
11 Years
Aug 17, 2008
261
1
119
Abiquiu, New Mexico
Thanks for these observations, suggestions and thoughts, exactly what I was hoping for. I do have plenty of land so am now thinking about that permanent coop, predator proofed for sure and with rotating runs, maybe even free range when outside with them. I might design a coop with all four sides able to be used and rotate them according to the seasons.
And provide plenty of area for the run as well. Thanks again, good chicken people.
 

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