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Questions about little giant still air

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by pinkfeather, Mar 22, 2008.

  1. pinkfeather

    pinkfeather Songster

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    Dec 3, 2007
    CT
    Hi Everyone!

    I have a little giant still air incubator. I was wondering what temperature and humidity it sould be at. I was trying to google it but I get a million different answers (from 98 to 102 degrees).[​IMG] I have a atomatic egg tuner too. Any suggestions? I am going to hatch bantam eggs.

    Thanks
     
  2. NYREDS

    NYREDS Crowing

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    Jan 14, 2008
    A still air LG should run at 101 degrees. Humidity 50% during setting increased to65% during hatching
     
  3. coffeemama

    coffeemama Barista Queen

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    I say use a wiggler at 99.5-100.5. My LG is all over the place with air temps but my wiggler temps stay pretty even.
     
  4. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Songster

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    I have to run my LG still air at 103.5 at the egg tops to get my wiggler to read 100.5.

    Can you test it a few days first?
     
  5. pinkfeather

    pinkfeather Songster

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    CT
    What's a wriggler?? I have tested it before and it stayed steady at 99.5. It has been running a couple of days, but then I saw bunch of different temps and wasn't sure what to keep it at (just trying to keep it around 100). It's at 100.2 now.

    Thanks
     
  6. coopist

    coopist Songster

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    Jan 2, 2008
    Midwest U.S.
    Hi,

    A lot of people on the forum use a child's toy called a "water wiggler" to simulate the internal temperature of an egg inside the incubator. It's nice but not absolutely necessary if you have a good thermometer. For instance, Brinsea makes a nice liquid in glass thermometer that is absolutely accurate.

    You should measure the air temperature at egg height (top of the egg). This is particularly important if you have a turner, because temp can vary several degrees from bottom to top in a still air. It should be 101 degrees at egg height in the turner.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2008
  7. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Crowing Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    The egg turner will raise the temps about 1 degree so you need to acct for that. It is good to use a surge protector to help with night time temp spikes too.

    Good luck!
     
  8. pinkfeather

    pinkfeather Songster

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    CT
    Hey guys,

    Thanks for your answers! We have a good thermomator that's at egg hieght. I tried to turn it up to 101 but it jumped to 104! Yikes! Good thing I don't have any eggs in there (yet). Why would a surge protector help with the night time temps?

    Thanks
     
  9. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    I tried to turn it up to 101 but it jumped to 104! Yikes !

    Several people have mentioned before that the LG temp. control is a little too sensitive. It's a good idea to get it running, and stable for a few days before setting eggs.

    Voltage spikes shouldn't affect mechanical incubators at all. They can wreak havoc on electronic controls tho.

    Either way, a surge protector is a cheap and sensible precaution.​
     

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