DesertGrrl

Chirping
Sep 24, 2020
163
304
96
Arizona
I did this as a first time brooder for 2 chicks:
- Pine pellet bedding
- Purina Medicated Chick Crumble
feed
- Small feeder and waterer
- A 50 gallon Sterilite storage container with the top cut so I can put in hardware cloth in the top.
- A small container of chick grit
- This can house about 2 to 5 chicks.

I will buy a bigger container for my next batch of 10 or so chicks (I buy extras in case some die).
 

Egg Snatcher

Songster
May 11, 2020
986
1,571
198
@chickenn00b11, my advise to you. Your chicks are going to need some sort of heat source, heat lamp or heat plate. You will also need some were to put them, like in your house, basement, or shed with electronic. Make sure your chicks have food, chick starter, and water. By 3 week or so they would have feathers and can live in a coop. Homemade or store bought. You should feed them chick starter until you get your first egg. Then you feed your chickens layer crumble or pellets.

I started of with 4, but you start of with as many as you like. You also need to now if you want bantam or regular sized chickens. Bantams are small, have more yolk in the egg, and lay small eggs, like to go broody. Standard sized lay big eggs, bigger than bantams, not as broody. You also need to know is you want a rooster. Roosters are good for protecting your flock and you can get babies.
Hope this helps, good luck! I had to do the same thing, convince my parents to let me have chickens. Good luck!
 

Biring

Chirping
Oct 17, 2020
29
117
56
Pick a breed you like the look of. They all lay eggs and pretty soon you’ll have more than enough. I started out with point-of-lay pullets - 20-week-old female chickens. If you can find a local seller I suggest that’s a good way to start. Four pullets is probably enough to start with. Consider getting bantams as they are smaller birds and much less destructive in the garden. If and when you decide to breed your own chicks you can get a rooster, quite possibly for free as there are lots of people who need to get rid of their male chickens.
 

chickenn00b11

Chirping
Oct 13, 2020
155
445
83
Bay Area
@chickenn00b11, my advise to you. Your chicks are going to need some sort of heat source, heat lamp or heat plate. You will also need some were to put them, like in your house, basement, or shed with electronic. Make sure your chicks have food, chick starter, and water. By 3 week or so they would have feathers and can live in a coop. Homemade or store bought. You should feed them chick starter until you get your first egg. Then you feed your chickens layer crumble or pellets.

I started of with 4, but you start of with as many as you like. You also need to now if you want bantam or regular sized chickens. Bantams are small, have more yolk in the egg, and lay small eggs, like to go broody. Standard sized lay big eggs, bigger than bantams, not as broody. You also need to know is you want a rooster. Roosters are good for protecting your flock and you can get babies.
Hope this helps, good luck! I had to do the same thing, convince my parents to let me have chickens. Good luck!
I'm going to get a heater and brooder.
 

akdunn

Chirping
Oct 3, 2020
51
86
56
Yeah I was thinking that building my own is the better option. Considering my dad is an engineer it shouldn't be that hard right? Do you have a good video that shows how to build one? Also, what breed would you recommend that is easy, but lays eggs often?
I have Isa browns and they are super easy and friendly and lay tons of eggs. I also have California whites which is probably my favorite and they are the friendliest of all my lady’s and they tend to also lay the most.
 

yakitori

Songster
Jun 22, 2020
571
990
171
New York
- Pine pellet bedding
I’m a big fan of pine pellet bedding (expanded) too!

I lay down about 3in, and then all I need to do is scoop and fluff it up everyday (heck you don’t even need to scoop for a day or two if you’re lazy, just mix it in!). You won’t need to change this out for the duration of the brooding. Grit is essential for this set up as they will eat some of the bedding.
 

CNJ

Chirping
Oct 12, 2020
183
416
83
I’m a big fan of pine pellet bedding (expanded) too!

I lay down about 3in, and then all I need to do is scoop and fluff it up everyday (heck you don’t even need to scoop for a day or two if you’re lazy, just mix it in!). You won’t need to change this out for the duration of the brooding. Grit is essential for this set up as they will eat some of the bedding.
Maybe you can grow milky mushrooms in the pine pellets when you're done.
 

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