Red tailed hawks

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by petrufka, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. petrufka

    petrufka New Egg

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    Jul 17, 2016
    There is a nest of redtailed hawks in my neighborhood of south minneapolis. In fact it is in my neighbors tree. Three of them can be seen hopping around in the canopy and flying around our yards. I have 6 large hens. Barred rock, rhode island red. Buff orpington. Americauna, and california white, black astralop. Im wondering if these maturr ladies (1 and 2 years old) are too big for a red tailed hawk to eat? Does anyonebhave information about whether red tailed hawks are a threat to chickens?
     
  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    Red tails aren't usually chicken hawks. But they can be if they get hungry. I've had mature hens killed by hawks in the past. You may want to cover your run. It's illegal to shoot them, but I've found the sound of a gun will scare them off pretty quickly most of the time.
     
  3. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    As a young boy I saw a 75 year old German lady blow a RTH out of the sky with a 12 gauge scatter gun to protect her hens. I know she killed it because I followed the glide path and found the RTH in a ditch and retrieved it for a reward of homemade sweets. Just call me the human Labrador Retriever, but I didn't carry it in my mouth, sorry.

    Definition of a Chicken Hawk:
    Any bird of prey of the hawk family that commonly preys on domestic fowl, but especially Sharp Shinned or Blue Darter Hawks, Coopers Hawks, and Red Tailed Hawks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  4. sebloc

    sebloc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello
    I have a lot of red tailed hawks. When my chickens were around the age of 6-8 weeks, we brought them outside and the hawks went insane. By 10-12 weeks (now) we have brought them outside for a little walk, and though we do hear the hawks, they do not seem to be going after the chickens. The more mature the chickens are, the less of a chance they will go after them. If the chickens are in a group, forget it, rt hawks will never attempt to kill em. With a rooster, the chance is even lower. They should be able to fend themselves off from one or two at full maturity. If there's more then 6 hawks, then they may be able to take a chicken or two out (if it's vulnerable). The crows and blue jays usually fight with the hawks, so that's enough to keep them occupied in our town. :D
     
  5. sebloc

    sebloc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, do NOT try killing them. In most states (including mine) it is illegal to kill a red tailed hawk. (One of my friends learned that the hard way :/) Using a bb gun of some sort will scare them off (as said in the post above me).
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  6. cra-zchicknlady

    cra-zchicknlady Out Of The Brooder

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    Red Tailed Hawks are opportunists. If they are hungry and your chickens are out, they'll make a try for one. Either cover your run with bird netting, but be ready to untangle an angry hawk, or get a loud rooster. He'll sound the alarm and your chickens should take cover.
     
  7. flockeeper

    flockeeper Out Of The Brooder

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    I agree. I've had one chicken killed by a hawk when is was half grown, but they don't bother my chickens when their full grown and with roosters.
     
  8. sebloc

    sebloc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not sure untangling a hawk is the best idea, so I would figure covering your run with hardware cloth would be more then enough.
     
  9. sebloc

    sebloc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My 10 year old brother got mad when he saw a hawk trying to attack the 6 week old chicks and shot it with a nerf gun. Surprisingly, it flew away and didn't bother coming back.
     
  10. cra-zchicknlady

    cra-zchicknlady Out Of The Brooder

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    Untangling's not a big deal. Use a thick comforter or horse blanket, wrap it around it's head and wings, and it'll calm right down. That's why hoods work so well with them. If they don't see you, you don't exist.
     

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