Removing chicks from their mom

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by SuperPeacockman, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    Last year one of our hens sat on and hatched four eggs. The chicks hatched in mid september and I know I am going to have to remove them soon. Does anyone have any tips to make the transition less stressful for all the birds? Their are six birds in the pen, mom dad and the four babies if that helps.
     
  2. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    I strongly suggest leaving them together. Peafowl employ helper systems where new chicks are looked after by their older siblings as well as both parents. You may want to add some walls of straw bales in two corners of the enclosure so the teenagers have their own time out space but you'll be surprised at how well they all get along together. In nature, peafowl don't begin to disperse until they are in their second year (Indian) and third year (dragons). Plenty of people break up families before then but there's no reason to unless you've decided you just have to sell them.
     
  3. featherhead

    featherhead Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 1, 2008
    Kentucky, USA
    The youngsters will likely recover after a day or two. It's not only stressful being separated from their mom, but moving to a new environment as well. If the youngsters are kept together, or in pairs, that will mitigate a lot of the panic.
     
  4. SuperPeacockman

    SuperPeacockman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    6
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    Sep 1, 2010
    Long Island, NY
    Resolution I am really worried about the dad and the male chick. The chicks are scared of him already and I am fairly certain he played no part in parenting, other than stealing chick food (he liked it better than his food). I am worried the dad will not tolerate another male when the chick gets older.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  5. 6littlechickies

    6littlechickies Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    Burton, OH
    When peas are not naturally running about across a wide range the rules of cohabitation that could occur in nature go out the window. If you pen them together don't be surprised to see the chicks endangered or worse as the male moves into breeding. There is just not enough room for the family to keep the nature buffers. Move the chicks but keep them together they are old enough to be just fine.
     
  6. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    6 Littlechickies is right. If your set up doesn't have adequate space for a whole flock you're just asking for trouble. There's nothing more that I can't stand is the whining moan of a distressed pea keat but they'll settle down soon enough. It's too bad the father had so little to do with the chicks. He was probably not parent-reared. It will be interesting to learn how involved his male offspring are with their chicks.
     

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