Respiratory problems or something else?

Eddie12109

Chirping
Nov 14, 2020
162
50
60
Hi everyone,
I have been dealing with respiratory problems for some time and need help. I have a hen who is three years old and has been having respiratory problems for almost a year-ish. She used to breath with her mouth open but now she keeps it closed but you can hear that it is extremely raspy and labored. She acts like a normal chicken besides this and that she sneezes a lot. I would think that if she had a disease she would have died by now. A few of my older chickens have had respiratory problems like her but have gotten better and it is calmed down. Everyday I put VetRx mixed with water in their bread and also put it on their beaks everyday. I have been doing this for more than 5 months and everyone besides her seems to be somewhat better. Does anyone know what else I should try or what this could be?
 

Eggcessive

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Apr 3, 2011
57,646
48,702
1,202
southern Ohio
Most respiratory diseases in chickens are chronic and can be with them for life. MG or mycoplasma, coryza, ILT virus, or infectious bronchitis are some of the common ones. Since she has been having symptoms do long, she may have some air sacculitis or fungal respiratory disease which can be secondary diseases. Have you tried treating her with antibiotics? Tylosin, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and othesprs may help treat MG. Here is where you might get some to treat her innher water:
https://www.jedds.com/shop/tylan-soluble-100-g/

https://pigeonsuppliesplus.com/products/doxy-tylan-100-grams-pdr-pigeon-supplies-plus-line
 

Eddie12109

Chirping
Nov 14, 2020
162
50
60
Aren’t those antibiotics only given if you go to the vet? But no I have not tried that but I will get some of the Tylan one. What is the dosage? And is there any treatment for air saculitis or a fungal respiratory disease?
 

Nendei

Chirping
May 30, 2020
240
218
91
I’d honestly cull the sickest bird and send it off to get tested so you know what exact disease you’re dealing with. Respiratory diseases in chickens are indeed chronic and will never go away and come back in stressful events. Antibiotics will help ease and mask symptoms, keeping your chickens asymptomatic and carriers of the diseases, continuing to spread it to non-infected birds. Respiratory disease in time can become resistant to antibiotics, so it’s best to switch it up every once in a while.
 

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