Risk associated with buying fertilized eggs.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ecarline, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. ecarline

    ecarline New Egg

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    Jul 28, 2016
    I recently purchased over $200 in rare breed chicks who looked healthy but have began sneezing and wheezing. I lost my first one yesterday. I started them on antibiotic and hope I can save some but I want to avoid this heartache and finicail mistake again. I was wondering is it a better bet to buy fertilized eggs and hatch them in the enviroment I control rather than purchase the chicks. NPIP certifications do not cover all disease processes that could kill your flock so I have lost faith in what to trust. Do fertilized eggs pose a risk to your flock still?
    Thanks to everyone in advance
     
  2. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    There are a few diseases that can be transmitted through hatching eggs, but even with those that can, the chance of transmission is very low (usually below 10%). Hatching eggs are one of the safest ways to introduce birds to your flock.
     
  3. ecarline

    ecarline New Egg

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    Jul 28, 2016
    Thanks so much. I would rather go with the low risk alternative.
     
  4. ecarline

    ecarline New Egg

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    Jul 28, 2016
    Just got back the lab reports. It is Mycoplasma so now I have to decide to keep them forever separate or kill them. So sad
     
  5. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Oh man, I'm so sorry. I've been in your position in the past so I know exactly how you feel. That's a really tough decision to have to make.

    When it happened to me, I chose to keep them. On account of my interest in breeding, selling, and showing, I strongly regret that decision now, as I'm unwilling to be the kind of crappy human that will do that to another person.

    If you just want backyard laying birds, you're fine with not ever selling showing or breeding, and you're willing to take extra biosecurity precautions to be sure you do not spread the disease to someone else by accident, then you may consider simply keeping this flock for its lifespan. Mycoplasma can be managed, though it's a bit of a hassle. But if you have even the slightest interest in breeding or selling... I'd tell you not to make the mistake I did and cull them now.
     
  6. ecarline

    ecarline New Egg

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    Jul 28, 2016
    Breeding and hatching is exactly what I want to do. My mom is considering a small flock for herself so I'm hoping she will take them. They will be gorgeous birds. I don't want to kill them. I contacted the hatchery I purchased them from and she told me I was crazy. She has never heard of Mycoplasma and her birds are fine but my bird died 3 days after purchase so I know it came from the hatchery. The fact that she says she never heard of it speaks loads. She told me to rub them with vapor rub. LOL
     
  7. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop


    Ugh. That kind of person is the worst. Mycoplasma is impossible to ignore if you have enough birds. Mycoplasma is a reportable disease in some areas, you may contact your local ag department and see if they can do something about her. She's selling sick birds - which the government wouldn't really care about, except in certain areas poultry farming churns out a lot of money, and things like Myco are a threat to that.
     
  8. microchick

    microchick Overrun With Chickens

    I am so sorry you are going through this.

    Rest assured if the hatchery you bought the chicks from has done this to you, they are doing it to others also, especially if the breeder is so ignorant as far as communicable poultry diseases are concerned

    I would be finding out the name and phone number of the USDA service center where the breeder lives and making a phone call. What they are doing is what spreads disease throughout healthy flocks and needs to be stopped. I believe the USDA can do just that.......just saying.

    Good luck rehoming your birds. You are to be commended for trying to save their little lives.
     

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