Roo Question

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by vortec, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. vortec

    vortec Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 29, 2009
    Martin County, NC
    I am going to be getting my first chicks on the 22nd of this month, and I am so excited

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    I have been working on finishing the coop, run, and brooder over the last weekend( I was even hammering a T post with a 10 lb sledge hammer, one arm on the post, one on the hammer. That was a site, lol ) and don't worry I will post pics this weekend.

    The topic at hand though is a question I have with keeping a roo that can breed the hens at all times, throughout the generations. I know that you have to cull the roos or at least remove them from the main flock after the chicks are born to prevent in-breeding so that means that those roos will be done after that. The roos that hatch cannot be bread with the hens that they were born from as that is the same thing, right? How far in advance do I need to raise the roos that will replace the breeders that will be culled as his chicks grow to maturity? Any help is always appreciated and thanks in advance

    vortec
     
  2. Master S.M.C

    Master S.M.C Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 23, 2009
    Maryland
    Why don't you just keep the new chicks separate from the rooster as they grow to maturity,so you have a mature and educated roo. When the boys of the new breeding flock get older, introduce them to see if you can get a stronger rooster.
     
  3. moduckman

    moduckman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 2, 2009
    Cairo, Missouri
    Inbreeding is okay in poultry as long as it's father/daughter or mother/son, (not brother/sister). keep the one rooster and replace him with his son in a couple of years.
     
  4. jjparke

    jjparke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Boise
    You need to do some research on chicken genetics because it is a whole different monster than what you consider normal breeding. Inbreeding/crossbreeding it's all different in chickens. Try google.
     

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