roo woes

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by thefishery, Jul 19, 2010.

  1. thefishery

    thefishery Songster

    260
    0
    121
    Oct 19, 2009
    Jeffersonville
    Question 1:

    I've got a flock of 13 (including Henny Penny and her three babies). Out of those 13 I know for sure that I have 4 roosters. Three are about 14 weeks old, and one is my original roo who is about 3. I've got 5 more chicks about 10 weeks old that I'm pretty sure all are pullets. I did think that one of those was going to be a roo but I've changed my mind about that one. Is 4 out of 13 a good combination?


    Question 2:

    My flock is free ranged. I've got one BR roo that I'm a little concerned with. He's got a bad attitude and is almost bigger than my original roo. I understand he is going through some hormonal changes right now but, I've got several neighbors with roosters....trying not to get kicked off the site....their roos are not pets, kwim. I am afraid my roo will hear the crowing from the neighbors and possibly roam over there and then I'll never see him again. Is that a possibility? Should I keep young hormonal roos pinned up in the run when the rest are free ranging? If I do pin him, should I leave him with a couple girls if I do?



    TIA
     
  2. greyhorsewoman

    greyhorsewoman Songster

    853
    0
    149
    Mar 3, 2008
    Endless Mts, NE PA
    IMHO -- 4 to 13 is WAY too many roos. Your hens will be torn up for sure when they are mature.

    Free ranging ... how close? Do your neighbors free range too? Could be disastrous for all. At the very least, all the roos will spend their days (and night) crowing back and forth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2010
  3. thefishery

    thefishery Songster

    260
    0
    121
    Oct 19, 2009
    Jeffersonville
    Quote:[​IMG] I hate to have to get rid of some of my guys. My original roo ONLY hangs out with the original hen...if that makes a difference. But if 4 is way too many, how old is too old to butcher a roo and have it be tough?


    The neighbors do not free range, they keep each rooster their own separate hut. It really isn't the roos that I'm concerned with, it's the neighbors. The closest neighbor is across the street, diagonal to us. The next closest one is a little further down across the road. The one I am worried most about is a cross the street. When we got our first roo and hen, the roo got lose and ran off. The neighbor found him in his back yard fighting one of his roosters through the little hut. He claimed that my rooster almost killed his. I find it hard to believe but, do roosters typically visit other crowing roosters?
     
  4. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    Totally agree with GHW...4 roos for 13 hens is was too much. You might be able to get by with two if their personalities mesh, and shouldn't be too hard on the girls if they're mannerly. As a matter of fact, I would base who I keep on how they treat the girls and their attitude toward you/your family, so you may not be able to tell yet unless they've already been mating. But I would still keep an eye on your girls for back damage, even with two. Now, if you keep bachelor quarters for your roosters only, then you could probably manage them all.
    Yes, some roosters will certainly confront perceived competition if the neighbor is just across the road, and your neighbor would have every right to shoot your rooster if he comes onto his property and harasses his birds (no offense). Plus he could charge you for damage to his bird if it would happen. So confining that particular rooster at least sounds wise...
     
  5. thefishery

    thefishery Songster

    260
    0
    121
    Oct 19, 2009
    Jeffersonville
    Quote:So I can make a coop for just the guys to share? That sounds ideal. So far, nobody is unfriendly with the family. My kids play with them and they are very friendly with them, the one is just a little rough with the girls right now. I guess he is ready for some action and the girls are just too young still. The only hens he would have a chance for are the original hen who has babies right now and belongs to the original roo. The other hen, he picks on. I don't know if he's trying to claim his steak with her or just bully her.

    As for the neighbor, I wouldn't blame him for shooting one of my birds if they went over there. I've promised to shoot another neighbors dog if I see it again over here. I doubt I'll ever have charges brought up against me for my bird killing one of the neighbors since they are operating illegally. I'd be afraid of what they would do to me and my family.
     
  6. bigchicken2

    bigchicken2 Songster

    221
    1
    101
    May 17, 2010
    I have 4 roos and 9 hens. Not much fighting or bald backs here!
     
  7. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    IMO, you really got lucky then BC2, with that ratio. Breeds and ages may make a difference??? Individual temperment will play a big part too.
    But yes, thefishery, many folks have separate pens for their roosters. You could wait and see what happens...maybe you'll get lucky like BC2 did. But be prepared to NOT find harmony at that ratio. There's always the exception, but many roos do fine with one another if they grew up together and aren't competing for hens, so hopefully your younger guys would do fine in their own coop/run. Good luck! Hope it works out well for you. [​IMG]
     
  8. 500592

    500592 In the Brooder

    58
    0
    29
    Sep 23, 2009
    i agree most everybody else but thats just my 2 cents
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by