Rooster acting egg-bound

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Crazie Eddie, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. Crazie Eddie

    Crazie Eddie Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2013
    Hi All

    Yes, I know he can't be egg bound, but that's how he's acting - like he's trying to pass a huge egg! He does this pathetic little peeping noise, wheezes a bit and strains. He's also standing with his little legs spread apart as he's straining. His backside is damp looking but not poopy looking. He's still doing his rooster duties and appears to be eating well.

    This happened a few months ago, I suspected parasites and gave the flock a good dollop of pumpkin, and the symptoms seemed to clear up a bit.

    Everyone else in the flock seems fine.

    Any suggestions?

    Many thanks....

    Pat
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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  3. Crazie Eddie

    Crazie Eddie Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2013
    Thanks Scratch - I would hate to toss all those eggs though if I end up having to treat the whole flock. I've not handled Bubba (my bad) and I don't know if I could get it down his throat. He does seem to prefer greens to scratch, so maybe I could serve it to him as a salad dressing...?

    Pat
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Worms weaken a chickens immune system opening the door for bacterail, viral, and fungal diseases to infect chickens compounding the problem. Worms will eventually kill a chicken, no hens...no eggs. Tossing eggs after worming is a small price to pay for healthy chickens.
    Use an effective wormer such as valbazen cattle/sheep wormer or safeguard liquid goat wormer, both these wormers eliminate most types of worms that chickens can get.
     
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  5. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, at least try worming your roo, Bubba. I have used wormers in paste form, and they are usually quite small dose amounts, like 1/2 cc, and I can divide the dose and wrap it in a piece of lettuce of a soft piece of bread. Then you need to redose again in 10 days. If his symptoms go away then you know it was likely a worm problem and the hens probably have worms, too.
     
  6. Crazie Eddie

    Crazie Eddie Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2013
    Bread - why didn't think of that! And yes, they all probably need worming (you are quite right Dawg), I need to get on a schedule to do it when they aren't laying so well...

    Thanks!

    Pat
     
  7. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    The only thing about putting the wormer in treats is you have to get each chicken alone or the dominant, hogging chickens will eat all the treats and get an extra dose or more. And you will have a hard time keeping track of how much the less assertive chickens got.
     
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