Rooster maybe? *pics*

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by JNorth, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. JNorth

    JNorth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are curious since my husband decided to take a chance this year with a chick from and unsexed run. We have a friendly wager going based on the chicks feathers, since we don't agree. What say you?

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    Also, at what age does it become obvious that a chick is a rooster? I'm not quite sold on having a rooster in the mix...
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    If the parents are set up properly genetically it works really well. It’s the common way commercial hatcheries use for broiler hybrids and used with some egg-laying hybrids.

    If you want details on how sex links work you can read and study the first post in this thread. Just the first post, don’t worry about the rest. Tim does a great job explaining how sex links work and feather sexing is one of the three methods he discusses but you will probably have to read it a few times to catch on. I sure did.

    Tadkerson’s Sex Link Thread
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=261208

    For feather-sexing to work, the mother has to have the dominant slow feathering gene, which she gives to her sons but not her daughters. The father has to have the recessive fast feathering gene and not the slow-feathering version which he gives to both his sons and daughters. So the daughters wind up with only the fast feathering gene and the sons wind up with one of each. Since slow is dominant over fast, they feather out slower.

    This only works for a few days after hatch but for someone that knows what to look for, it’s obvious. There are several videos that show how to do that, but most of them eliminate the part about setting the parents up properly genetically first.

    If those are purebred chicks from a hatchery, the parents are not going to be set up right. That would require keeping two separate flocks of that breed. That’s not going to happen, too expensive. So for each chick, it’s 50-50.
     
  3. Araucana16

    Araucana16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm with the first poster. DEFINITELY depends on the breed, and it may be too late anyway.

    As for when... that depends! I've seen a video of a day old cock crowing, and I've seen people with much older chickens that they aren't sure about.

    In general, the first signs would come in around 3-5 weeks, and soon after that you'll know. Watch for feather development that indicates cock (saddle feathers) and comb color. Also, behavior should change.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I forgot the when and how can you tell question. Check the first post in this thread.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/48329/secondary-sex-characteristics

    Sexual dimorphism means it doesn’t always work this young. There are always exceptions and some breeds are definitely harder than others. Usually with my flock I can tell at about 5 weeks which ones are definitely males. Red combs and wattles, heavy legs, and sometimes just body confirmation and posture. But I’m not always sure on the pullets. Some males just develop these traits later than others.

    If you post photos we can try to guess. Often around 5 to 6 weeks we’ll all agree. But there have been several cases where we can’t all agree at 4 months. Some of them are just that hard.
     
  5. Araucana16

    Araucana16 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With Ridgerunner. If you aren't sure, by four weeks, we can give you a good guess, and be right around 2/3 to 3/4 of the time, and by 6, we can usually say for sure what you've got.

    Unless you have silkies... [​IMG]

    Forgot to mention, what a precious baby you've got [​IMG]
     
  6. JNorth

    JNorth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for all of that information! I will definitely be taking pics along the way as we try to discover the sex of our Dixie Rainbow! It was about 1 week old in the above pics. It's smaller than all of the other pullets we have (Black Sex Links and suspected New Hampshires). It's also not nearly as feathered as the other pullets who have almost all of their wing feathers and are working on tail feathers. I've read that males are slower to feather but this is the first time we have had a Dixie Rainbow so I'm not sure if it's the breed or the gender at this point. We shall see! [​IMG]
     
  7. JNorth

    JNorth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rooster watch 2014 update :p
    So this may or may not mean anything but we've noticed that our mystery chick has a big personality, despite its small size and lack of feathers. If you stick your fingers in the brooder, it's the first to peck. When we open the door it's the first to come running over. It also seems to have no fear of our hands and doesn't shy away from being held. Still only has feathers on the wings, nothing on the tail or around the neck. Compared to the rest :pof the flock this one still looks like a new chick.
     

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