Rooster Psychologist Needed!!

roosterhavoc

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9 Years
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A little side conversation shouldn't be considered hijacking. Quite a few people do the samething.
I've seen many threads like that.
Either way there’s no issue I just don’t agree with you. If whatever you are doing works for you by all means do it. Everyone has a different setup, amount of birds, big yard, small yard etc and it all makes a difference. There’s really not a one size fits all approach.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
10 Years
Mar 15, 2010
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On the MN prairie.
His hormones are raging, and he is telling you that you are beneath him in the pecking order. Do not turn your back on him and nip any other aggressive behavior in the bud. He will try you again.
As usual, I’m late to the party, but I’ll share my opinion anyway. I agree with Sourland. Your “rooster” is actually an immature cockerel, full of hormones and his behavior needs to be nipped. When my cockerels are old enough for me to know that they are cockerels, I stop handling them. I move with confidence when I’m around them. I walk through them to get where I want to be. I keep an eye on them and if one starts to move aggressively toward me, I will walk towards that bird and back him up. Sometimes I will just move them away from the food or water because I can. I don’t turn my back on them when they start feeling their oats. When I do get to that point, I don’t fully trust them at first. If one sneaks up behind me, I will turn around and walk toward it - again, making him move. I have not had a human aggressive rooster since I started raising them that way. He is not in charge, and he respects my space. I will not keep a rooster who is too stupid to figure out that I am not a predator. If he’s busy stalking me, he’s not doing his job.
 

roosterhavoc

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9 Years
Jan 5, 2012
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As usual, I’m late to the party, but I’ll share my opinion anyway. I agree with Sourland. Your “rooster” is actually an immature cockerel, full of hormones and his behavior needs to be nipped. When my cockerels are old enough for me to know that they are cockerels, I stop handling them. I move with confidence when I’m around them. I walk through them to get where I want to be. I keep an eye on them and if one starts to move aggressively toward me, I will walk towards that bird and back him up. Sometimes I will just move them away from the food or water because I can. I don’t turn my back on them when they start feeling their oats. When I do get to that point, I don’t fully trust them at first. If one sneaks up behind me, I will turn around and walk toward it - again, making him move. I have not had a human aggressive rooster since I started raising them that way. He is not in charge, and he respects my space. I will not keep a rooster who is too stupid to figure out that I am not a predator. If he’s busy stalking me, he’s not doing his job.
Calling a rooster stupid is kind of ironic. You proved my whole point thanks.
 

roosterhavoc

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Jan 5, 2012
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What point would that be? I started just skimming somewhere in the middle of the first page.
The point is roosters don’t think like a human. Sure there’s aggressive roosters out there but most have been made that way inadvertently by the way they were raised, handled, or whatever.
These threads constantly get down in the weeds cause someone always says “I won’t tolerate an aggressive rooster” well maybe the people that have the problem constantly which there are many here should look for a different approach.
Im not trying to be a know it all but I do have a ton of roosters (hundreds) and have for quite a few years. I’ve had like 3 roosters that needed their heads chopped off out of all of them because they were aggressive towards me and those were most likely my own fault.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
10 Years
Mar 15, 2010
15,473
31,399
1,072
On the MN prairie.
I agree - roosters aren’t humans and shouldn’t be treated as such. But in my opinion, a good rooster is able to figure out what a real threat to his flock is. I have been raising chickens for almost 40 years, although not with the volume you have. Over that time, I have gained a wee bit of experience as well as developing some (maybe strongly held) opinions. One thing I have learned is that a good rooster can coexist with his keeper without attacking.
 

roosterhavoc

Enabler
9 Years
Jan 5, 2012
21,619
56,628
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I agree - roosters aren’t humans and shouldn’t be treated as such. But in my opinion, a good rooster is able to figure out what a real threat to his flock is. I have been raising chickens for almost 40 years, although not with the volume you have. Over that time, I have gained a wee bit of experience as well as developing some (maybe strongly held) opinions. One thing I have learned is that a good rooster can coexist with his keeper without attacking.
I also agree. Where I differ with most is how that rooster got to that point in the first place.
 

gimmie birdies

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 12, 2013
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Eastern WA
Never turn your back on a rooster u don't trust. Also never offer him your foot, or a kick. That says you accept his challenge. I try to hold a rooster anytime he is near, soon he will only come by to be held.
 

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