Rooster Psychologist Needed!!

Shu Shu

In the Brooder
Apr 26, 2020
24
46
36
Hello-
Need help understanding my rooster's behavior. I hatched this handsome guy, hand fed him, held him and have been around him every single day. He is 28 weeks old and was introduced into my larger flock of 20 hens and one older rooster about 3 months ago. He is definitely rooster number two and gets chased/shooed away by the older rooster but the pen is massive and they have heaps of room. Very stress-free area. We are in Hawaii so year round warm weather. Anyway, today I did the usual. Fed everyone and started cutting open some papayas. I feed many of the hens by hand then place the papaya down in front of them. As I turned my back to get another papaya my rooster lunged at the back of my legs I guess (I didn't see it but felt it). I turned around and he was standing there. My instinct was to posture back to let him know I am the boss so I charged at him and he ran off. WHY on earth would he attack me? This has never ever happened and I am in shock. Advice welcomed and appreciated!
 

roosterhavoc

Enabler
Jan 5, 2012
21,351
53,968
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You should treat the rooster like he isn’t even there. Just walk by him and don’t hesitate even for a second. So many people have problems with roosters on here it’s sad. They don’t think like humans do so they can’t be treated that way either. You’re there to feed and water and he’s in charge. That’s what they do. They’re programmed from birth. He sees you as in his space. Understanding the birds mentality will go a long way to understanding what you’re doing wrong.
 

roosterhavoc

Enabler
Jan 5, 2012
21,351
53,968
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How does one nip the rooster aggression? If you won’t let a rooster be a rooster then my advice would be not to keep a rooster period. I can’t overstate it enough the rooster is in charge not you. If you want to be in charge then you don’t need a rooster. If you have a rooster that is ridiculously afraid of you he isn’t worth much in protecting or even sounding an alarm to the hens.
 

Shu Shu

In the Brooder
Apr 26, 2020
24
46
36
You should treat the rooster like he isn’t even there. Just walk by him and don’t hesitate even for a second. So many people have problems with roosters on here it’s sad. They don’t think like humans do so they can’t be treated that way either. You’re there to feed and water and he’s in charge. That’s what they do. They’re programmed from birth. He sees you as in his space. Understanding the birds mentality will go a long way to understanding what you’re doing wrong.
Thanks so much for the advice. I love him and his name is MaComes (after Mahomes after the quarterback). I guess I have hurt feelings that he would attack me. It was so random and out of the blue! Max my older rooster has never done that, so I don't know if they are having a power struggle of some sort and he saw me as another threat.
 

roosterhavoc

Enabler
Jan 5, 2012
21,351
53,968
1,101
Thanks so much for the advice. I love him and his name is MaComes (after Mahomes after the quarterback). I guess I have hurt feelings that he would attack me. It was so random and out of the blue! Max my older rooster has never done that, so I don't know if they are having a power struggle of some sort and he saw me as another threat.
Keeping more than one rooster causes all sorts of problems. Honestly you’re always better off with just one because things turn out screwy sometimes with more than 1. The less dominant will sometimes just sneak around roughing up hens and just generally being an *ss.
Roosters know space and hens and they’re in charge of both. Sometimes they get along because one will just concede power but the hens usually suffer. Putting roosters in a “bachelor” flock works for the owner but it’s terrible for the roosters. The low man will get mated by the other roosters with *raging hormones and sometimes beat to hell and back.
 

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