Rooster's aggressive morning routine???

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Cavendish Chickens, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. Cavendish Chickens

    Cavendish Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our rooster, Precious Boy, has a nasty morning routine. Every morning he aggressively chases, pecks, and bites the girls (Gloria and Mable). Then the rest of the day they all get along fine; eating together, dust bathing together, laying beside each other, etc. Now Precious Boy (speckled sussex) is 5 months old, the girls 4 months old. Gloria (white leghorn) is larger than Mable (light brown leghorn). So as of right now, the girls are not yet laying nor showing any obvious signs. But I worry about whether or not this behavior of the roo's will continue when they do. Why does he do this every morning? I assume to reassert dominance, but why so aggressively. We keep one of his wings clipped to the girls can fly up to get away from him. He is really mean to them in the mornings. The girls scream when he gets them, cluck as they try to run away from him, then eventually end up sitting up on top of the coop just to get away from him until he settles down. Is there anything we can do to put an end to this aggressive morning routine? Has anyone else had this problem? Advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!
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  2. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    *Ahem* He ... ummmm... has the equivalent of a woody in the morning. So to speak. The roosters always want to get some first thing in the morning. All that testosterone has built up during the night, you see.

    My dominant rooster tries to get out of the coop first, and then tag as many ladies as he can when they exit the pop door. He gets one, one gets by him, he gets the next one, etc.

    The junior roosters also are more intent on chasing the ladies in the morning, too.

    They all still do their thing in the afternoons and evenings, too, but it's really evident first thing in the morning.
     
  3. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Exact same thing here with silkey roo and to young hens. I don't think it is anything to worry about, might even be good to stir the hens up and get them moving/feeding.
     
  4. Pinky

    Pinky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had that happen with one of my RIR roosters. Every morning he would chase the hens. I had to separate him at night and not let him out in the morning until he calmed down.
     
  5. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    High testosterone level in the AM and wanting to catch up on a little loving. Two hens for one rooster is most likely not going to be enough "companionship." You'll need another dozen hens to satisfy his desires.
     
  6. Cavendish Chickens

    Cavendish Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Summit County, Ohio
    Lovely. lol So his attitude is because he's horny and can't get any because the hens aren't ready yet. lol Well, we didn't plan to have very many birds. Just 2 or 3, and got 3. Our pen is small, and where it is located, can't really be enlarged to encompass anymore. The whole space is 16'x9', coop is 4'x4'x8', leaving a small running space of 12'x9', and we built a 2'x2'x2' nest box for the hens that will come off of the coop (and stick slightly out of the pen) on the side that faces our house. They love their run, but I'm sure it would be too small to add any more to the "flock". And it's a little late in the year to renovate in anyway to expand run room. What advice do you guys have?

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  7. math ace

    math ace Overrun With Chickens

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    The juvie roos tend to be rough and impatient with their ladies. You may want to separate him from his girls for a little longer ( until he matures more). I know all my roos aroung the age of 4 - 5 months old were the roughest on the hens while they tried to figure out their technique. Combs were horrid during this time. . .

    You could run some wire / fencing down you cage where he see the girls but not touch.

    I am with the rest - - you need more hens or less roos ( none in your case).

    I have some room in my set up for a speckled sussex roo if you want to send him my way . . .[​IMG]
     
  8. Cavendish Chickens

    Cavendish Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How many can you keep in such a small space? 12'x5'? We don't want to get rid of him. He's our baby no matter what. We hatched him and I cuddled him every day until he was old enough to go outside. I don't want to separate them if it's not necessary. Like I said, we keep one of his wings clipped (and none of theirs) so they can fly up on top of the coop to get away from him. Plus he won't go on the roosts inside the coop, and they will. And they have two chairs to roost on that only the girls get on. So they have plenty of places to go to get away. For some reason he won't leave the ground. It's funny. He's never tried to get on a roost or anything ever. I guess it's just his "style" not to. So... anyway... wouldn't that be too small of a space to have anymore chickens?
     
  9. math ace

    math ace Overrun With Chickens

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    Sounds like it might be time to add on. . .

    12 x 5 is 60 square ft. If this is their outdoor space ( not including coop area), then you could get 2 more chickens without any troubles.

    However, 4 girls are still not enough for one young roo. . . He will mess them up and stress them out.

    The other option is just to keep him separated from the girls until you can add more onto the coop.
    See about doing a lawn tractor - - - you could put either the girls or the roo in it during the day and at night they could roost together.

    I separate my roo first thing in the morning. He goes to a free range area besides the coop. He hangs out along the fence line because his girls are still in the coop. My girls stay in the coop until after lunch. This gives everyone a chance to eat, drink, and lay eggs. AFter lunch, I let the girls free range with the roo for a few hours and then everyone returns to the coop in the evening.

    This limits my roo's access to the girls . . . .
     
  10. Cavendish Chickens

    Cavendish Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We couldn't do a tractor.. too many smart predators. But separating for the morning does sound like a good idea. I'll have to decide how to go about it. All we can really do is use a metal dog cage. Can't split the run. But I do like your idea. It's not an all day thing. But then... wouldn't he get jealous he gets taken away, separated, or penned and the girls don't? I will see what I can do. Thanks all!
     

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