Rooster's crop is always empty?

MaeM

Songster
Dec 9, 2020
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My roo was a bit underweight last month. Last time the vet saw him, he said he was better. We gave him antibiotics because he had an awful smell in his beak (now he doesn't) and drooled. Then all the flock was dewormed.

But I've noticed that his crop is always empty when I touch it. Even at dusk when everybody else in the flock is fat-chested. So far, I've seen that he doesn't eat as many treats as I thought because he gives them all to the ladies, but he is always free ranging and pecking on the ground, so I don't know what to think...

He acts normal, like a healthy boy, and is young (less than a year). Any thoughts?
 

Eggcessive

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Was there ever a yellow material inside his beak that might have been canker, since you said it was a bad odor? Canker is a chronic infection, and is contagious to others in the flock. It will usually come back. I would look inside his beak and throat with a flashlight now to see if you see anything off.
 

LaFleche

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Sep 22, 2012
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My roo was a bit underweight last month. Last time the vet saw him, he said he was better. We gave him antibiotics because he had an awful smell in his beak (now he doesn't) and drooled. Then all the flock was dewormed.

But I've noticed that his crop is always empty when I touch it. Even at dusk when everybody else in the flock is fat-chested. So far, I've seen that he doesn't eat as many treats as I thought because he gives them all to the ladies, but he is always free ranging and pecking on the ground, so I don't know what to think...

He acts normal, like a healthy boy, and is young (less than a year). Any thoughts?
Some roosters will leave all the food for the hens to stuff themselves to the brink, and only eat when they are on their own.

So separate him (somewhere he will not see or hear the hens) with a nice full bowl of feed and treats like scrambled eggs etc. Once or twice a week should suffice.
 

Chicken poppy

Crowing
May 9, 2021
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Connecticut
My roo was a bit underweight last month. Last time the vet saw him, he said he was better. We gave him antibiotics because he had an awful smell in his beak (now he doesn't) and drooled. Then all the flock was dewormed.

But I've noticed that his crop is always empty when I touch it. Even at dusk when everybody else in the flock is fat-chested. So far, I've seen that he doesn't eat as many treats as I thought because he gives them all to the ladies, but he is always free ranging and pecking on the ground, so I don't know what to think...

He acts normal, like a healthy boy, and is young (less than a year). Any thoughts?
I think it could be because hes getting all the food, from the sounds of it hes not eating well, make sure his stool is well + give hom seperate food Not with the ladies, so he can eat properly. thats what i do for mine and it worked.
 

MaeM

Songster
Dec 9, 2020
104
206
116
Was there ever a yellow material inside his beak that might have been canker, since you said it was a bad odor? Canker is a chronic infection, and is contagious to others in the flock. It will usually come back. I would look inside his beak and throat with a flashlight now to see if you see anything off.

No, he only had thick saliva. Currently nothing. He does shake his head every now and then though.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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But I've noticed that his crop is always empty when I touch it. Even at dusk when everybody else in the flock is fat-chested.

He acts normal, like a healthy boy, and is young (less than a year). Any thoughts?

He probably does not need to eat as much as the hens do, because he's not laying eggs. But of course he still needs to eat SOME food!

You could try giving all the chickens a dish of wet chicken food (just add water). They usually think it's a treat and gobble it up, so he might gobble along with them.

And I like what LaFleche suggested, to put him somewhere completely separate to eat a good meal on occasion.
 

Chicken poppy

Crowing
May 9, 2021
1,482
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Connecticut
He probably does not need to eat as much as the hens do, because he's not laying eggs. But of course he still needs to eat SOME food!

You could try giving all the chickens a dish of wet chicken food (just add water). They usually think it's a treat and gobble it up, so he might gobble along with them.

And I like what LaFleche suggested, to put him somewhere completely separate to eat a good meal on occasion.
Yeah if you do it with the girls he leaves when he notices how nuts the girls go for it.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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Yeah if you do it with the girls he leaves when he notices how nuts the girls go for it.
It might depend on the rooster, so it's probably worth trying at least once per rooster.

(Because it's easier to put down one dish of food for all, than to catch a rooster and put him somewhere else to eat, then put him back later. But it only helps the rooster if he'll actually eat it!)
 

Chicken poppy

Crowing
May 9, 2021
1,482
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Connecticut
It might depend on the rooster, so it's probably worth trying at least once per rooster.

(Because it's easier to put down one dish of food for all, than to catch a rooster and put him somewhere else to eat, then put him back later. But it only helps the rooster if he'll actually eat it!)
Yes, roosters usually wont eat with them, as thats the point of feeding them the food. So they leave, (how would it be easier to set down the dish for all then catch him and put him somewhere else? Why not just feed them separately? Just curious.)
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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Yes, roosters usually wont eat with them, as thats the point of feeding them the food. So they leave, (how would it be easier to set down the dish for all then catch him and put him somewhere else? Why not just feed them separately? Just curious.)

At least for me, if I can put down one dish and have ALL the chickens eat, it is easier.

Catching any chicken usually takes me a few extra minutes-- they do not just jump into my hands. And then I'd have to carry the rooster somewhere away from the hens, give him his food, and bring him back afterward-- that is several extra steps.

I don't know what will work for the OP, and I certainly agree that feeding the rooster separately might be needed. But I think it could be worth putting down a bowl of wet feed and watching, once or twice, and then making a decision based on the behavior of the specific rooster in question.
 

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