roosters crowing in concert?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by offmyroost, May 25, 2011.

  1. offmyroost

    offmyroost Out Of The Brooder

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    May 25, 2011
    Hi everyone. I am new to Backyard Chicken forum and to chicken raising for that matter. I have 14 chicks, ages 6 1/2 weeks to 8 weeks. I was hoping for all girls but one of my Americaunas grew quite large rapidly and started crowing 2 weeks ago. This morning as he was playing "alarm clock" I heard another sound interspersed between his crows. I raced into the room where they have their pen (the coop is almost finished--hooray!) and one of my Wyandottes was crowing also. They were alternating crows. This Wyandotte had grown much larger than the other chicks also, but she walks more like a hen and makes the typical "buck-buck" hen noise most of the time. I should also add that she is the only one (other than Abe, the rooster) that doesn't still peep. I can't figure out if she is just trying to sing along or if she is a he. Do roosters typically alternate their crowing? I have five Wyandottes. She is the only silver laced. The others are blue laced and golden laced and they are the four younger birds. But she is twice their size and they are nowhere close to the size she was a week and a half ago. Wynona the Wyandotte and Abe the Americauna both had quite reddened and pronounced combs and wattles at about 5 weeks. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. shesaredroan

    shesaredroan Chillin' With My Peeps

    offmyroost,
    From your description, I'm guessing you've got 2 roos. Since a roo's crow is his was of announcing his presence & claiming his territory, the roo's do tend to crow in concert. They are in a sense competing to claim the alpha position.

    Right now I have 5 mature roos (all different breeds) in my coop/yard. They have worked out who's the top dog and get along with each other.
    My younger roos don't crow, (they've learned to keep their heads low and not attract the older roos' attention), but when I rehome an older/alpha roo, the pecking order is rearranged and some of the youngsters will then start crowing.

    It's a guy thing. [​IMG]
     
  3. offmyroost

    offmyroost Out Of The Brooder

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    May 25, 2011
    shesaredroan,
    Thanks so much. I have a hunch you're right. Well, at least they are both nice birds. I don't think it will be a problem if they are both male. They seem to get along well. I love this chicken raising thing![​IMG]
     
  4. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    If you're just slightly sleepy some morning and not thinking of anything important to do, listen to the roos and pay attention to the metering, who crows first, who is next, does he crow again or does the other initiate another round?

    I have 9 sexually mature roosters and a few "tween-aged" cockerels in my flock. When I first moved here, I occasionally heard a rooster some distance away. After Carl, first and dominant roo, learned to crow (to my surprise as "Carly" was purchased as a pullet), the far-away rooster and Carl would trigger each other into crowing fests.

    Now, with the multiple voices, it is VERY interesting (in a sleepy, not doing much else with my brain at the time, manner) to listen to the invisible "pass" from one to another to another rooster. First Bartholomew, for no particular reason. Then Carl, to remind him who is boss. Then Alex, then a faint reply from the distant neighbor roo, then Carl again, then George, then Ghost, then Nugget, then Carl, longer, then.......

    Yup. They most definitely do crow in concert!!!
     

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