Rotten tree for soil amendment?

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by drewskimac, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I was walking through the woods hunting for morels and found a fallen tree. I noticed that the top half was completely rotten. I did what I always do, and scooped up a handful of the decomposed matter from the tree and sniffed it. As I was enjoying the clean, earthy smell I thought "I wonder if this would have a purpose in the garden?" What do you all think? I'm sure y'all know what i'm talking about... That stuff that is inside any rotten/dead tree that you saw into. It looks like, well, black soil. I can go take a picture if you need it.
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    Absolutely. You might enjoy doing a bit of reading about the benefits of Hugelkulture. I have a thread covering the topic, as well as other unconventional gardening methods.
     
  3. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, will check it out!
     
  4. AcornAcres

    AcornAcres Just Hatched

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    Rotten trees are great for the garden! I've put partially rotten logs as the bottom layer of my raised beds with great success. If nothing else, toss it into your compost pile and use it in next year's beds.
     
  5. 1700schicken

    1700schicken New Egg

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    I put in some raises beds last year. I dug down several feet first and loaded it up with first rotting birch logs, then sticks and finally leaves and grass. Then soil from the local farm. It was only the first year, but the vegetable did incredible. I'll be adding more to my new raises beds in the coming weeks.
    1700schicken
     
  6. 1cock2hens

    1cock2hens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thats a version of hugelkulture // I have my first one set up this year and it already has a blueberry bush, strawberries, peas and a bunch of herbs growing fast
     
  7. 1700schicken

    1700schicken New Egg

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    Yup, hugelkultur. I had a old maple removed last year. Had the workers leave me a bunch to put in the ground this year. Makes sense, a tree rots, and the soil benefits from the nutrients, which in turn is absorbed by the vegetables. Plus they hold water, so less watering is required. It's more work upfront, but the payoff is long lasting
    1700schicken
     
  8. drewskimac

    drewskimac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, but don't forget about the wonderful fungal benefits as well!
     
  9. 1700schicken

    1700schicken New Egg

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    Amen!
    Basically we are recreating on a small scale what happens in nature on a regular basis. Plants die, decompose so new life can spring forth. No wonder it works.
    1700schicken
     

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