Round worm treatment...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Amore Galline, May 10, 2012.

  1. Amore Galline

    Amore Galline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone, I've spent a few hours searching through older threads, hoping to find the answer to this, but haven't yet, so I'm hoping someone can come to my rescue.

    My chickens have round worms. I know this for sure as I found some of the worms in poop as I was cleaning the coup.

    I have seen non-specific deworming treatments suggested (or perhaps I should say "broad spectrum"), but I am hoping to avoid what appears will be throwing away a few weeks worth of eggs - is this possible? Or do all dewormers required discarding eggs after treatment?

    If throwing eggs out is what I have to do, then that's what I will have to do, I was just wondering if there was a round worm treatment that doesn't require it.

    Also, I would appreciate if someone could tell me the most effective round worm treatment, what the dose would be, and how it should be administered. Also, are these readily available from most feed stores in CA, and are they labeled for chickens or for other animals (in other words, are the medications the same for different species, just given in differing doses)?

    Thanks so much - the knowledge on this board is awesome!
     
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  2. anbhean

    anbhean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    LOL! I just posted a very similar thread! I'll have to watch yours too to see if it can cross over to my situation. Wish I could give advice, but I'm new at the round worm game myself. All I've found so far is Verm-x is all natural, but won't really kill anything. So you don't have to throw the eggs away, but it won't work. Also Eprinex supposedly has no withdraw time. But that is literally all I know. [​IMG]
     
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  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Eprinex has shown resistance to large roundworms and it wont kill cecal worms. Valbazen liquid cattle/sheep wormer will kill all worms and safeguard liquid goat wormer will kill most worms except tapeworms. Both have a 24 day withdrawal period when used properly.
     
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  4. Drainchicks1115

    Drainchicks1115 New Egg

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    I would love to know the answer too! Im sure there has to be something out there.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Flubenvet. If you dont mind administering it in feed to weight ratio over a period of 5-7 days...no withdrawal.
     
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  6. Amore Galline

    Amore Galline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks dawg53 ~ My local feed store didn't carry valbazen, so I had to order it on line. I now have a millennium supply!
    It was certainly easy enough to administer, I just put the 1/2 cc on a little individual treat of angel food cake, and the chickens ecstatically gobbled it up.

    So, do I understand correctly that I need to give a second dose 10 days after the first?
    And I will discard my eggs for 24 days.

    Does anyone know if the eggs are safe to feed to dogs? I just hate to waste them!
    Anything else I can do with them?

    Also, how often do most of you worm your chickens? Is this something you regularly do about twice a year?

    Thanks so much to everyone for the information!
     
  7. Shantycoke

    Shantycoke New Egg

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    I started using food grade diatemaceous earth. It keeps mites out of the coop and I put it in their food for worms. It's a natural substance, and it doesn't have any affect on the eggs. You can google it and see what you can find out about it, but I love the stuff.
    I actually had quite a swarm of ants inside a new coop I just built this year, sprayed the DE and every one of the ants died and I went ahead and sprayed the rest of the coop with it and have had no insects at all. Read up on it. You'll be glad you did.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Since this is your first post, I'm gonna let you in on a little secret which you'll eventually learn; DE is useless as a worm preventative and as a wormer, here's your proof:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...yza-or-crd-parasites-are-rampant#post_7474233
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
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  9. lagreca

    lagreca Just Hatched

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    I just found a few roundworms in my chickens feces.

    Here is a paper I found about roundworms and poultry:

    http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/phi/PHI/ROUNDWORMS PHI Handout from Dr. Smith.pdf

    Here is what the PDF says:

    Quote: Internal parasites are very common in pet, show, and backyard poultry. Probably the most common of the internal parasites are roundworms. There are many different types of roundworms that can infect poultry, but they all cause the same clinical signs and are diagnosed and treated the same. Roundworms are not very host specific, which means that your birds can get roundworms from wild birds and your various species of domestic poultry can pass roundworm infections among them.

    Clinical signs Younger birds are more likely to become ill, but birds of any age can be clinically affected. You’ll often only see clinical signs in one or two birds in a flock. These may be birds that have habits that cause them to get a more severe infection or they may be of a breed that has a greater susceptibility. Birds suffering from roundworm infections are usually thin with poor feather quality (dull, dark or poorly colored). They may look pale in their mouths. They may have diarrhea or have droppings pasted to the feathers near their vent. Birds can die from severe roundworm infections. If one or two birds are showing clinical signs suggestive of roundworm infection, the whole flock should be treated because the worst birds are only the tip of the iceberg, the other birds are likely infected as well.

    Diagnosis If your birds are showing clinical signs suggestive of roundworm infection, you can treat the flock and look for a response to treatment. If the clinical signs disappear, you were dealing with a roundworm infection. You can also more precisely and more quickly diagnose roundworms by taking a fecal sample to a veterinarian for a fecal floatation. Any small animal veterinarian should be able to do this for you because roundworm eggs from dogs and cats look like roundworm eggs from poultry. If a different internal parasite is present, the veterinarian can also tell you about that. You need to gather about 1 tablespoon of fresh feces (still moist). Make sure you gather the feces in the droppings not the white urates. Put them in a zip lock baggie to keep them moist until you can take them to the veterinarian. Try to get feces from several droppings, especially from the birds showing clinical signs. You may have to isolate them in a cage or small pen until you get their droppings.

    Treatment There are only two drugs labeled for use in poultry to treat roundworms. Neither is labeled for use in laying hens. You can use them for growing chickens or turkeys or meat birds. Wazine (Piperazine). Wazine can be given individually by mouth or in the drinking water to a flock. There is a 14 day meat withdrawal. This means you cannot eat meat from treated birds or sell treated birds to be eaten for 14 days after treatment. Purina Liquid Dewormer (Piperazine). This dewormer can also be given individually by mouth or in the drinking water to a flock. There is a 0 day withdrawal for meat.

    Prevention Roundworms are primarily spread by the oral/fecal route, meaning a bird has to eat feces or something contaminated by feces to become infected. Keep waterers and feeders clean. Use feeders and waterers that are designed to minimize fecal contamination of the food and water. Don’t allow your birds to eat off the ground, put any food you give them into feeders. You can build 2x4 frames with wire attached to put feeders and waterers on so that the birds don’t have access to spilled feed and wet soil. Wet soil attracts earthworms to the surface where birds can eat them. Earthworms are common carriers of some roundworms, so preventing your birds from eating them is also helpful. Use deep litter in coops. This allows droppings to become buried where birds don’t have as much access to them and it dilutes out the amount of droppings the birds might ingest if they eat litter. Clean out the coop frequently to prevent a buildup of droppings. Don’t overcrowd your birds. Overcrowding exposes the birds to more droppings. You can use Wazine or Purina Liquid Dewormer as a preventative treatment to keep numbers of roundworms down in your flock. If you practice good preventive management you may not need to do this or you may only need to do it once yearly. If your birds are at high risk of roundworms because of your management, you may need to deworm quarterly or twice yearly. Checking fecal floatations at intervals after deworming can give you an idea when the worm load increases to a point where the birds need to be treated again under your management system.
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    @lagreca , welcome to BYC! Do you need help picking a wormer?

    -Kathy
     
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