Rubber eggs - is internal laying inevitable?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kikster, May 12, 2010.

  1. kikster

    kikster Out Of The Brooder

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    She just started laying this spring (around March, I think) her shells were extremely thin in the beginning, and eventually we weren't seeing any from her. Or at least we thought. We started noticing egg yolk on her beak and in the nest box, so we thought she was breaking them open (not hard to do) and eating them. Then one day I found one of the other chickens running around with the rubbery membrane in her mouth and this girl was chasing her. I assumed that it was her who'd laid it since she had a history of the paper thin shells anyway. Since then she has only laid rubber eggs, and not many at that. This has gone on for the last month. She laid another rubber egg this morning (well actually all I saw was the membrane).

    We have oyster shell free choice, they are on layer feed, and we feed eggshells (which they love). The other girls eggs are hard as bricks, so it is very odd/noticeable that she is like this. We've had her in the house lately to make sure that she's she's eating some calcium rich treats, I also understand that Vit D helps w/absorption, but not sure the best source of it. We've been giving her liquid calcium as well. She is eating and drinking fine right now, comb still bright red, full of energy (giving us quite the fuss over having to be inside) and she is having normal poops. However, we are starting to notice some of the telltale swelling and warming of the abdomen lately, that comes with internal laying.

    I'm wondering if it is inevitable now that she will be an internal layer? Seeing as she hasn't laid a shelled egg in a month? Is she actually sicker than she seems? Is there anything we can do for her at this point?
     
  2. chickensioux

    chickensioux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  3. kikster

    kikster Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for your reply. That website did say that its only cause for worry if it is re-occurring , which it is in our case.

    This is why I"m worried. I've searched and read as many threads as possible before posting my question because I don't feel like I've found out exactly how to handle this situation.

    Should she be kept away from the flock under close observation/treatment or do we wait until she poses more symptoms?


    It just seems that whenever we post on injuries/cures, it's when our girls are on their death beds, especially in the case of internal layers. I'm just trying to diagnose as soon as possible, so that if there's something that can be done, we will do it now before it's too late...
     
  4. chickensioux

    chickensioux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From what I am reading if she had either of the known diseases that can cause soft shells, there would be other symptoms present as well. But I always go on the side of caution when there is an unknown and so I would keep her seperated for awhile. You can start her on an antibiotic (if you suspect internal laying). Baytril is a really good one. Usually precription but sometimes can be found on the web. If she has laid internally, there really isn't much that can be done otherwise. The antibiotic would just stave off any internal infection from starting. It sounds like you are supplying the right nutrients. I suppose she still could be a late bloomer and it is just taking her awhile to start functioning properly since this is her first spring of laying. Keep us posted and maybe someone else will see this and have an idea too.
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/979/maintaining-egg-shell-quality

    And
    here is another website regarding egg shell quality.

    Do your chickens freerange?
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  5. kikster

    kikster Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much for your quick replies. [​IMG]

    I've considered her being a late bloomer, too, only she started out laying shelled and then slowly progressed to where she is now. Seems kinda backwards from what I expected, but we are new chicken keepers, so I don't really know what to think. Just trying to piece together bits of info that I've read here and elsewhere.

    As for antibiotics, we do have Pen G, I could start her on that, in case there is an infection. I think we will keep her quarantined for now to make sure she's eating/drinking properly and to see if her egg quality improves. Thanks for the link, I'll go check it out now!

    BTW, they don't get to free range often. They have a pretty large pen, and we let them out when we can, into the rest of the yard (usually on weekends). We used to do it more often, but then they'd put up a HUGE fuss on their "in" days, whenever they'd been "out" so many days in a row. So we limited their time, for the neighbors sake...
     
  6. chickensioux

    chickensioux Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another thing I read was they like dark greens like dark lettuce, spinach, broccoli, etc. This too can help with egg strength. Since they don't freerange and get grass, this might help. You can also give grass clippings as long as the roots aren't attached (no pulling of grass) it can cause troubles with the crop.
     

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