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San Diego Chicken meetup and Chat thread

Discussion in 'Chickenstocks, Shows, Meet-Ups' started by tigerrrrrrrlilly, Aug 11, 2010.

  1. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He can have sunflower seeds or millet in moderation, but large amounts can cause trouble. It is also like scratch and not very nutritious, more like a treat.
    It's hard to change a duck from what it is used to, so it won't be easy to get him eating greens etc. try sprouting some wheat or barley, dried peas or lentils for now. It looks more like seed to him and is much more nutritious. It only takes around 2 days to sprout them.

    Tom did eat some Mazuri Waterfowl pellets at the meetup (when my daughter fed him and the others all Leah's food [​IMG]). You can get that at JC Feed or Carter's Hay & Grain in Lakeside, they only sell large 50# bags though.
    You could also feed him gamebird or turkey feed, it's pretty much same as chicken feed but higher protein. Any chicken food (besides scratch or any medicated) would be better for him than what people give. You can buy it by the lb instead of large bags at East County Feed in Santee.

    It's probably best to not feed him though, if he is 15+ years old, then he has survived off more than people feeding him. He must have a decent food source, if people don't feed him he probably just goes out and finds a way to feed himself. He must be for him to have lived that long. If he is really that old, he likely isn't going to be around too much longer, ducks generally live 10-15 years when fed proper diet in captivity. The people giving bread would be the cause for liver problems, it causes fatty deposits to develope around the liver, had he been totally dependant on them as a main source of food, he would have died many years ago.

    The ducks and birds are actually better off in the winter when they aren't being fed as much because they are forced to migrate to other areas and find/forage/hunt the proper food for themselves. Don't worry about them starving, being hungry forces them to fend for themselves, find another food source and learn not to be completely dependant.

    I hope I didn't seem rude or anything. I know you care about them and want the best for them. I care too. I love ducks (and all animals) and feel sorry for what they go through in the public lakes and parks. I'd bring them all home if I could!
     
  2. desertdarlene

    desertdarlene Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, I didn't think you were rude, I understand what you're saying and it really is a problem and doesn't really help. I didn't approve of anyone feeding the animals until a couple of friends of mine started doing it. I don't think I would have seen as many ducklings last year if they hadn't. But, I don't want to contribute to any more problems. I mostly care about the domestic ducks and any wild ducks that might have "issues" like curly. I try not to feed the other ducks at all or just once in a while. They do like the bird seed and I think they just pick through what they like and don't like.

    Tom actually filters the seed through his tongue and spits out most of the millet and "filler" seeds. I think he likes the sunflower seeds and the shelled seeds. I also think he liked this one brown rice cereal that I eat, too, but it doesn't have hardly any calories in it. I'll try sprouting some beans or peas. I think he doesn't like the texture of soft food.

    I have spotted him foraging by touch, a little, eating grass and possibly worms and snails.

    None of the birds are getting fed nearly as much as they used to since the signs went up.
     
  3. Farmerboy247

    Farmerboy247 Out Of The Brooder

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    Does anybody around the county breed or have cornish bantams??? im interested in getting some
     
  4. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tigerrrrrrrlilly, I understand what you're saying. I feel that if the lake is going to allow ducks to remain there then it's their obligation to care for them. That means offering them proper nutrition. If lake employees set out proper feed before the public was allowed in, if there were duck food vending machines so the public could feed them throughout the day, and stiff fines for those who did not follow the rules, then at least the ducks would be getting better care. To do nothing is neglect. It's a wonderful thing having the ducks there. It needs to be managed better.

    That would be better than what is going on for sure.
    It still leaves the issues of overpopulation and dependency. If they don't migrate because there is always food there, they will over breed, collect all in one area like they do now, all poop in the same areas of land and water, it piles up and breeds diseases, (ie. salmonella, cocci, mericks), just like if you don't clean your coops, the too-poopy water can kill or disease the fish and plants they eat. It only takes one infected bird to wipe out the entire flock. Food from people that will still feed them, (ducks will not necessarily eat it when being fed properly), will collect on waters edge and grow mold, aspergillus and can cause botulism. Even if they don't eat it. Manpower consists of usually just one or two rangers and could not be enough to keep it clean enough to care for them like we do at home. We wouldn't overcrowd our coops for health reasons, it is the same issues for them as for chickens.
    Dept. of Fish and Wildlife took a really long time to enforce the no-feeding rule, it really was in the duck's best interest and many animal-rights groups pushed for it. It's horrible when they end up having to euthanize thousands from one lake because an epidemic has started due to overpopulation and disease. They aren't pets and need to be respected as wild animals in their natural habitat -- unless someone is going to responsibly care for them as if it is their own backyard.
    They can't really be disallowed in the parks, and letting them do what they do naturally is what's best for them, as hard as it is to watch sometimes. Proper nutrition is out there for them if they don't have the interference of humans.​
     
  5. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    Quote:That would be better than what is going on for sure.
    It still leaves the issues of overpopulation and dependency. If they don't migrate because there is always food there, they will over breed, collect all in one area like they do now, all poop in the same areas of land and water, it piles up and breeds diseases, (ie. salmonella, cocci, mericks), just like if you don't clean your coops, the too-poopy water can kill or disease the fish and plants they eat. It only takes one infected bird to wipe out the entire flock. Food from people that will still feed them, (ducks will not necessarily eat it when being fed properly), will collect on waters edge and grow mold, aspergillus and can cause botulism. Even if they don't eat it. Manpower consists of usually just one or two rangers and could not be enough to keep it clean enough to care for them like we do at home. We wouldn't overcrowd our coops for health reasons, it is the same issues for them as for chickens.
    Dept. of Fish and Wildlife took a really long time to enforce the no-feeding rule, it really was in the duck's best interest and many animal-rights groups pushed for it. It's horrible when they end up having to euthanize thousands from one lake because an epidemic has started due to overpopulation and disease. They aren't pets and need to be respected as wild animals in their natural habitat -- unless someone is going to responsibly care for them as if it is their own backyard.
    They can't really be disallowed in the parks, and letting them do what they do naturally is what's best for them, as hard as it is to watch sometimes. Proper nutrition is out there for them if they don't have the interference of humans.

    There are clearly two issues, the wild ducks and the domestic ducks. Seems that the wild ducks should be left alone and the domestic ducks should be re-homed. It's impossible to manage them both independently of one another.

    Hey, I have a totally different question for you. My mom's friend had three ducks (Muscovies). One was always picking on another and she gave that duck to my mom. My mom just answered an ad on CL for another duck and took her friend along. My mom took one duck home, her friend took two. So now, the friend has four ducks: the bossy duck, her original flock mate that she got along with, and two new birds. I guess the new birds are keeping to themselves, but now the bossy one is picking on her flock mate. I suggested that she remove the bossy duck and reintroduce her in a couple of days. Just like we do with a bossy hen. Was that good advice or do you have better advice?
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2011
  6. SunnyCalifornia

    SunnyCalifornia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Since we're on the subject of waterfowl......

    DH has given me the greenlight to get a GOOSE!! Now, I have no experience with geese, but I plan on reading up on them before I order. He wants a big noisy goose as our backyard security guard, and picked out a Super African from the Metzer catalog. They are big, they are loud, and they don't fly (my fences are low).

    The purpose is to protect my flock, so they can free range a bit more, and just be our "watchdog" in the back. I have two dogs, but one is really old, and doesn't get around well, and the other is too preoccupied finding a place to scratch her butt to notice much else, so for that reason, they can't be relied upon. [​IMG]

    My goal is to deter the hawks, my husband's goal is to deter anyone, and anything that wants to get in the backyard. We also get our fair share of transients where we live.

    So...thoughts?

    And just to be sure, geese don't count in chicken math, right? 'Cause they are a goose..
     
  7. tigerrrrrrrlilly

    tigerrrrrrrlilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    knockkneed- Pecking order is basically the same as with chickens, so I think that was sound advice. If it's harmless nipping I would just let them work it out.
    She may just be alpha and letting the other know she is still the boss even though there is new birds there?? [​IMG]

    Sunny - Geese are awesome protectors. Care is similar to ducks, if you need help with that just let me know. I think it's a great idea for why you want it. Geese bond very strongly - more so than ducks- so be prepared. It will be very needy (and lovable).
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2011
  8. HatchingFever

    HatchingFever Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2011
    hey does anyone want to buy somer fertile mutt eggs for $6 a dozen SunnyCalifornia bought 2 dozen last week will have chicks for sale next monday also
     
  9. SunValleySeramas

    SunValleySeramas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    SUNNYCALIFORNIA**** YOU asked:

    And just to be sure, geese don't count in chicken math, right? 'Cause they are a goose..
    They completely dont count in chicken Math!! I think that they are wicked good guard animals, kind of like guinnea fowl... Sounds like fun.
     
  10. flower

    flower Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In a moment of weakness, I ordered a Brinsea Incubator. Sure hope that I can find customers for my chicks. There are so many breeds out there that I am interested in. But quantity is another story.
     

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