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scalding

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by jamie40, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. jamie40

    jamie40 New Egg

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    Sep 9, 2013
    when scalding a chicken why does it make the chicken stiffen up so ? i cleaning 2 of mine today i scalding 1 and dry plucked the 1. the one i scalded stiffened up right away the one i dry plucked stayed soft but good luck on the whole dry plucking thing i just ended up skining her because i couldnt get all the feathers off. when i prepared the water i got it to 180 degrees and dunked the bird a serval times and it stiffened up right away ....any ideas ???? thanks for any help
     
  2. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Rigor mortis sets in between 1/2 hour and 4 hours after death. Temp does play a role in how fast it sets in. If your water was too hot (it should be around 150f) it will set in faster.

    After scalding dip in cold water before plucking. It helps keep the meat from cooking and makes it easier to pluck without burning yourself.

    The rigor mortis won't be an issue. Just let it pass. Age the bird in the fridge 48 hours before freezing or eating.
     
  3. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: It's burning, which contracts the skin. I prefer scalding before plucking as this also seals the skin somewhat, which is preferable when you like to spit roast them, as we do. Keeps the juices in better. ;)

    We don't 'age' or 'rest' meat, the majority of the time we start cooking it as soon as it's processed and eat it as soon as it's cool enough. Not a fan of old meat. Plenty of people throw them straight into the freezer or fridge, no 'hanging' or whatever. It's all a matter of personal preference.

    Some people think if you don't let it sit, it'll be tough, but that's not been our experience. Toughness is based more on genetics, feed, and age.

    Best wishes.
     
  4. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Must be what you are used to. Even my Cornish X were tough and really unedible right after processing. We finished at 11am and cooked three hours after. Terrible. The chickens liked it though.

    They were 7 weeks and free ranged since 2 weeks. Their diet was very good.
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I personally like chewy meat but bred for tender meat to suit those in my family who do not appreciate chewy meat, so it's not really a case of what I'm used to. I specifically bred certain bantam genetics into larger fowl for their great feed economy, easy-fleshing at any age, and their tender, juicy, flavorsome meat. Many people seem to think all bantams are stringy meatless things but plenty of us have had the opposite experience. I prefer bantam infused large fowl over the common meat birds.
     

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