serama leg color...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by gumbii, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. gumbii

    gumbii Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 7, 2010
    bell gardens, ca
    who picked yellow to be the standard...?

    they're so ugly and hideous...



    reminds me of cheap meat bird legs from the grocery store... why couldn't they picked white...? or even slate like dutch...

    who should i shake my fist at...?
     
  2. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,759
    37
    183
    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    Because they and japanese bantams have yellow skin. I like it.
     
  3. smoothmule

    smoothmule Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,699
    69
    241
    Apr 12, 2008
    Buffalo, Missouri
    I am very partial to the yellow legs. It's such a vibrant color to match the vibrant colors that Serama's can come in. If you show at the Cajun Classic, the leg color isn't as likely to be an issue as with APA or ABA. Type over leg color at Jerry's. I have some of both but the deeper the yellow on the legs, the better I like them.

    I like both the dark yellow and the swarthy legs. I think there might be a time when I would prefer the lighter legs, depending on the Serama's feather colors. If you had a washed out diluted leg on a colorfully feathered bird, I don't see a lot of people thinking that was attractive and when you show, it's about being correct but also about being attractive, eye popping and a washed out color isn't as likely to attract attention. Green is kind of cool with the right feather colors but not correct either so I sold my 2 little green legged pullets. It was actually kind of a weird look with their plain brown feathers anyway but I've got Araucana's too and willow/green legs are correct with certain varieties.

    I wasn't sure I thought pale legs were so bad but when I started hatching out better leg color, wow, I think it's very eye catching

    [​IMG]

    I think paler or at least slate legs look okay on blue but even they have more wow if the legs are darker. I have some black chicks with very black legs and some with swarthy legs. I'm sort of torn. The black legs are kind of cool looking but then when I see other breeders black Serama's with dark yellow legs, again, wow....very appealing to me. I will be breeding my chocolates towards dark yellow with minimal swarthy-ness but deep yellow legs on a solid chocolate is really, really nice.

    Even in the wild bird world, the more vibrant is generally the choice when choosing a mate

    Cathy
     
  4. edgarmongold

    edgarmongold Chillin' With My Peeps

    172
    0
    89
    Apr 16, 2011
    You can shake your fist at me for the leg color of yellow or swarthy.

    The leg color was chosen for all varieties so that one can create new colors without having to worry about breeding for leg color.

    If you do not like the yellow or swarthy leg color of the American Serama you might try the Malaysian Serama which has no color designated.

    A leg color was needed for recognization by the ABA and APA.
     
  5. gumbii

    gumbii Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 7, 2010
    bell gardens, ca
    [​IMG]
     
  6. gumbii

    gumbii Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 7, 2010
    bell gardens, ca
    just playing... LOL...


    but srsly... i find it kind of ugly... very ugly... ha... but i see that everyone has yellow legged serama now... and malaysia are super pricey to get shipped... oh well... i would want to have white legged birds...

    do blue seramas also need to have yellow legs...?
     
  7. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:I am sure it will be altered based on variety as it moves forward it is very very difficult to get a yelow leg on Black and Blue Birds. Not impossible but very hard. the other thing to keep in mind teh more OE that are brought in to the Serama to stabilize color the less you will see the yellow leg as there are no yellow legs in OE.
    I expect as time passes and more varieties are proposed for acceptance beyond white then you will see the leg color changes based on variety as we have with other multi variety breeds.
     
  8. gumbii

    gumbii Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 7, 2010
    bell gardens, ca
    Quote:I am sure it will be altered based on variety as it moves forward it is very very difficult to get a yelow leg on Black and Blue Birds. Not impossible but very hard. the other thing to keep in mind teh more OE that are brought in to the Serama to stabilize color the less you will see the yellow leg as there are no yellow legs in OE.
    I expect as time passes and more varieties are proposed for acceptance beyond white then you will see the leg color changes based on variety as we have with other multi variety breeds.

    so, is that why all "american" serama look very much like OEGB...? so far, i've been seeing more and more gigantic tailed serama and some a bit taller than most... i always thought serama were the smallest of the chicken breeds... but some of my OEGB are a couple of ounces under a type A serama... if people are making serama look like OEGB, why not just get OEGB chickens...? LOL...




    hahahhaa... i'm such a scrooge... i like seramas, but just don't understand why people would breed OEGB into them... what does that do...? why did they do it...? and yellow... srsly...? LOL... but i guess... oegb are mostly white, dutch are slate/gray, and looks like nothing bantam and gamey had yellow legs... makes sense to me...

    oh well... need to sell my house and get a couple of malaysian seramas...
     
  9. SunnyCalifornia

    SunnyCalifornia Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,505
    15
    174
    Oct 8, 2010
    Escondido CA
    I don't think breeders like Jerry Schexnayder, and some of the other members of SCNA use any OEGBs in their programs. They seem pretty dedicated to preserving the Malay blood, even if it takes longer to acheive desired colors, and get rid of undesired characteristics.
     
  10. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,381
    37
    351
    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:I am sure it will be altered based on variety as it moves forward it is very very difficult to get a yelow leg on Black and Blue Birds. Not impossible but very hard. the other thing to keep in mind teh more OE that are brought in to the Serama to stabilize color the less you will see the yellow leg as there are no yellow legs in OE.
    I expect as time passes and more varieties are proposed for acceptance beyond white then you will see the leg color changes based on variety as we have with other multi variety breeds.

    so, is that why all "american" serama look very much like OEGB...? so far, i've been seeing more and more gigantic tailed serama and some a bit taller than most... i always thought serama were the smallest of the chicken breeds... but some of my OEGB are a couple of ounces under a type A serama... if people are making serama look like OEGB, why not just get OEGB chickens...? LOL...




    hahahhaa... i'm such a scrooge... i like seramas, but just don't understand why people would breed OEGB into them... what does that do...? why did they do it...? and yellow... srsly...? LOL... but i guess... oegb are mostly white, dutch are slate/gray, and looks like nothing bantam and gamey had yellow legs... makes sense to me...

    oh well... need to sell my house and get a couple of malaysian seramas...

    No it's not. I don't know any Serama breeders that cross their birds with OEGB. The leg color for Serama is set to yellow and it will always be yellow. It is difficult to get yellow legs on dark (black, blue) birds, but it is not impossible. I believe 'swarthy' legs are acceptable on darker birds.

    The reason why some of your OEGB are smaller or as small as Seramas is due to the OEGB breeders. OEGB should be 22-24 ounces, maybe a little smaller/bigger depending on sex and age. OEGB breeders are breeding these birds way too small.

    ETA: Old English body types are much different than Serama body types. Using Old English to introduce any trait would do more harm than good to someone's breeding program.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2011

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by