Sex- linked Information

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by tadkerson, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    no, their "Golden" tone is of a Lemon shade not buffish, but mostly on the hackles and saddle feathers, the body will mostly be silver

    Quote:
    thats becaused you were using a "different" type of sex links, the Barring one, and the one I was talking about is the Silver/Gold type of sex links. Co and Db can restrict eumelanin(black feathers) to the tail
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  2. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    you did not Misunderstood.! the males would in fact be "Golden" Columbian.. a "golden" Columbian genotype is S/s+ Co/ and a Silver Columbian is S/S Co/ the amount of gold leaking thru the silver will depend on other genes..

    how does a Golden Columbian male looks like?

     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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  4. Adam7

    Adam7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thought this might be the thread with people in the know.

    What 2 specific breeds are crossed to create a "Gold Star". My local feed store will be selling these. I know they are a gold sex link I just want to know what specific breeds were used for this cross. Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  5. LAFreewayChickens

    LAFreewayChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would say I did misunderstand. So gold is incompletely dominant, like black/blue/splash? (But only in males, since females only get one gene). I thought the males from a red sexlink cross were silver, but now I understand. The are "golden" (but not "gold").

    Then I've hatched "golden columbian" males when I've crossed my Cream Legbar roo with a Delaware hen, (although I've sold them before any gold started leaking through). I have two of the little buggers in my brooder right now.
     
  6. farmerChef

    farmerChef Chillin' With My Peeps

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    usually a gold sexlink is made using a buff rooster instead of a red one. There are alot of breeds you can use, you just need a certain color.
    I am making black sexlinks using a Mottled Ancona over a Dominique.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    I’m confident Nicalandia will correct me if I am wrong. Making mistakes and getting corrected is one way I learn. I think there are two different kinds of possible “gold” leakage in the red sex link males. One is just straight leakage, like in this photo. This male is not a sex link but from a Speckled Sussex rooster over a Black Australorp hen but I think it shows this type of leakage fairly well. These feathers can be just random. I'm not convinced that hatchery SS roo was pure for mahogany or I think this red would have been darker. Some from this cross were but this gold shows up better in the photo.

    [​IMG]

    The other type is in the saddle and hackle feathers. I tihnk this is what Nicalandia is really talking about. Instead of being white, they are what I call rusty. This is a red sex link, out of the same Speckled Sussex rooster but a Delaware hen. This does not show it real well but there is a distinct difference in the basic white body color and the rusty saddle and hackle feathers. I really did not see much of that other type of leakage on my red sex link males but I'm learning with chickens, about anything is possible.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  8. catdaddyfro

    catdaddyfro Overrun With Chickens

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    More than likely being they are from hatchery/industrial type stock they are not created by crossing breeds per say ie; Rhode island red over a Rhode island white. It goes more like a hybrid type of red or production type red male over some production/hybrid white type female all this usually done via a 4-6 way cross going back to the grandparent generations in these hybrid sex link crosses. One would have to search hard to really find the true breed(s) genetically of what they are created from. There is not a goal in sustaining a type/breed here, this is purely a high egg yield industrial/production cross, (conglomeration,LOL)

    Jeff

    OH and too pst.."it's a secret anyway", LOL the factories that produce these aren't about to let their secret to success out to "ol Joe" for sure, "that there" is/would be bad business LOL
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2013
  9. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The following are my observations and thoughts; purely anecdotal, so read them as such.

    Red and Speckled Sussex down color is not the wild type or brown pattern. The E locus on the light sussex is different that is why you see the ? marks.

    The first male is heterozygous silver/gold and extended black/? that is the way the gold is expressed because there are two factors that are involved. I believe the brown is there because the male carries extended black- it has to do with how things work on the cell level. The feathers normally would be white or at most a straw color (due to the silver/gold) but because he is extended black you get a different color (brownish buff). I have seen this coloration on my blacks and also a difference in how gold is expressed on dark brown restricted extended black/light wheaten birds.

    The second photo is typical of how silver/gold is expressed on light wheaten/? heterozygotes or homozygous wheaten males. The reason I have a ? on the E locus of the sussex is because their down color is different and does not fit the pattern for a homozygous wild type or homozygous brown. The down color is definitely not a wheaten.Silver females will normally express the color on their backs- like a cream color or a brown color ( due to autosomal red). See picture below. If mahogany and autosomal red are carried by a female ( even if she is silver), the back will be a dark red color on a white base color or the color of the hen below. Like a delaware female with a red back.

    one female- silver with red leakage
    [​IMG]

    Here is a pattern that can be seen on males. He is a silver/gold and light wheaten/brown heterozygote. You can see the strong expression of autosomal red and mahogany on him (the red shoulders and back). He also has the straw color in his hackles.

    [​IMG]

    I did notice one thing- my males that were homozygous silver did not express red color while my hemizygous females did. That may be due to the fact the males has two silver alleles and the female has one. None of the males expressed any red/buff/straw color. Could be because I did not hatch enough males. Remember this is anecdotal.

    [​IMG]


    Tim
     
  10. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No silver is incompletely dominant to gold. Gold is recessive to silver. The red color that is expressed in a silver/gold male is dependent upon other genes in the bird. It is not just the incomplete dominance of silver that produces red/straw color in males. Red sex linked males are heterozygous or split for silver and gold. How much red shows in a male depends on other genes the male will carry. See post 629.

    Tim
     

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