Should I stock pile eggs?

Chichi_08

Chirping
Jun 18, 2017
51
32
81
Ontario, Canada
My Coop
My Coop
With winter officially here, I’ve noticed that my hens have started to slow down on their egg production. I’m getting from 7 hens 5-7 eggs a day. I know eventually they will likely stop laying all together for the winter. When should I start to stock pile my eggs? I would like to have enough to last me through the winter where I won’t have to buy any from the grocery store (I don’t think I can ever go back to “regular eggs” )
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,048
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Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
Coat you surplus eggs with lard or shorting and store in a cold place. Refrigerators are cold places but they can and do cause massive moisture loss from most foods. Coating the eggs with lard or shorting will reduce moisture loss. Eggs coated with lat should then last longer, lose less moisture, and definitely be in better shape when you break them out. The lard or vegetable shorting will also slow down any bacteria from entering the egg through the porous eggshell.
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,060
18,404
867
St. Louis, MO
Coat you surplus eggs with lard or shorting and store in a cold place. Refrigerators are cold places but they can and do cause massive moisture loss from most foods. Coating the eggs with lard or shorting will reduce moisture loss. Eggs coated with lat should then last longer, lose less moisture, and definitely be in better shape when you break them out. The lard or vegetable shorting will also slow down any bacteria from entering the egg through the porous eggshell.
A study has shown that technique to only be marginally effective and many of the old wives tales of egg storage treatments to be false and in most cases, worse than doing nothing.
In 20 controlled batches of 36 eggs each, one was packed in lard and one was merely coated in lard.
https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/how-to-store-fresh-eggs-zmaz77ndzgoe
Again, the most effective was no treatment other than unwashed in a sealed refrigerated container.
I have read that if you add cracked corn to their diet the egg production will keep up. We added it to ours and our chickens are still laying steadily.
That too is nonsense. Adding corn to the diet will lower the essential amino acid content, the very thing that promotes ovulation.
Many first year layers will continue right through their first autumn and winter. After that, they must molt every year and no amount of corn will cause them to lay through molt, but rather prolong it.
 
Last edited:

Krazyquilts

Songster
Aug 2, 2016
1,018
839
237
Geneva, Ohio (northeast of Cleveland)
A study has shown that technique to only be marginally effective and many of the old wives tales of egg storage treatments to be false.
In 20 controlled batches of 36 eggs each, one was packed in lard and one was merely coated in lard.
https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/how-to-store-fresh-eggs-zmaz77ndzgoe
Again, the most effective was no treatment other than unwashed in a sealed refrigerated container.

That too is nonsense. Adding corn to the diet will lower the essential amino acid content, the very thing that promotes ovulation.
Many first year layers will continue right through their first autumn and winter. After that, they must molt every year and no amount of corn will cause them to lay through molt, but rather prolong it.
:goodpost:

I was hoping someone would link to that article so I didn't have to dig it up while on my iPhone!
 

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