1. otter123

    otter123 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm just starting to get into showing chickens at local fairs. Need some suggestions on breeds that do well at shows, thanks!
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    The breeds that seem to most often win at shows are Wyandotte Bantams, Cochin Bantams, Old English Game Bantams, Plymouth Rock Bantams, Plymouth Rock large fowl, Silkies, Leghorn Bantams, and Australorps.

    Keep in mind that any breed can do well if it is well groomed and in good condition. But, for a beginner, if you stick to one of the breeds above, you'll likely do very well. Another thing to keep in mind is that the solid colored varieties (white and black) tend to do best of all. A beginner would likely be best off starting with a white or black bird and focusing on breeding typey birds, and then move on to improving a color pattern.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2014
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Any breed of chicken can do well at a show as long as it meets the Standard of Perfection. However, there are a few common breeds which are considered more "perfected" than others, and which usually do best at shows. They include: White Plymouth Rocks (large and bantam), Black Australorps, White and Black Wyandottes (large and bantam), White Leghorns (large and bantam), Old English Game Bantams of many color varieties, Birchen Modern Game bantams, Rhode Island Red large fowl (from quality lines), and White Crested Black Polish (large and bantam). Silkies and Cochins also tend to do rather well in some areas.

    In general, solid colored birds (non-patterned) are the easiest to "perfect." That is why many people like showing black, white, or red colored birds. With those varieties, it is possible to focus almost completely on the type of the birds, without worrying about color. A common phrase is "build a barn before you paint it." (make good type before thinking of color). However, a well-bred patterned breed/variety is a beautiful sight, and I don't discourage anyone from starting with a non-solid colored breed.

    The most important thing is that you purchase from a reputable breeder, not a hatchery/large scale dealer. You simply will not find show-quality purebred poultry at hatcheries--they focus on quantity, not quality. The best thing you can do is read up on the standard for whatever breed(s) you choose, learn as much as you can, and then try to select some good starter birds.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2014
  4. otter123

    otter123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the information, I was looking at some old english bantams and seramas to start out, and also maybe later down the line phoenixes and brabanters.
     
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Old English Game bantams would likely be good to begin with. I would personally stay away from the Seramas, at least for now. Many Seramas exhibited at shows are too large. Also, the American Bantam Association and American Poultry Association (APA) only recognizes a couple varieties. Most Seramas I've seen do not fit those color varieties and can only be shown in special table-top classes at some shows.

    Phoenixes are a good breed too, though you may have trouble keeping them in good condition. Brabanters are not a recognized breed by the APA and would only be able to get Best of Breed at most poultry shows and go no farther. I would stick with the more common breeds for now.

    Good luck!
     
  6. otter123

    otter123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the advice!
     
  7. RhodeRunner

    RhodeRunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When asked this question, I recommend researching which breeds will fair best with your method of housing, climate conditions, and other requirements such as meat, eggs, brooding, or pets. As long as the breed is recognized by the American Standard of Perfection, you can show it. You don't have to own a fancy Polish to win, you could have a basic backyard flock of Rhode Island Reds.
     
  8. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Henderson's Chicken Chart is a good source for narrowing down your choices of breeds for further research
     
  9. rainbowrooster

    rainbowrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It depends on your goals. Do you want to be the overall winner or just win more often at the breed or variety level. If you want to win the overall show then concentrate on established breeds with solid colors. There will also be great competition with those breeds/varieties. If you would like to win a lot of individual first places and collect premium money then show more of the rarer varieties. You most likely will not win best of show but you may earn more money since there is less competition in those classes.
     
  10. Silseb

    Silseb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Choose a breed that you really like at home as well and you will enjoy you're hobby more. .also sometimes you're birds will may not be in show condition for a show-molting, etc-but you will still have a great time keeping them and taking care of them. Then, when you do show, and win, it will be icing on the cake :)
    Stick with a popular breed at first if you want to be in the champ row often. Solid colors are easier, as mentioned by several.
     

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