Sick chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by HenguyCA, Mar 28, 2018.

  1. HenguyCA

    HenguyCA Hatching

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    Mar 28, 2018
    Hello all!


    So, we recently moved to the suburbs from The City. With the extra land, we went out and got chickens. We’re vegetarian and have them as pets and enjoy the truly organic eggs. We currently have 2 grown chickens, 2 young chicks, and a rooster.


    About 6 weeks ago, we had a chicken die on us. She was still young and suddenly started with the following symptoms:


    Lethargic

    Not eating

    Diarrhea

    Some light mucus coming from beak


    It was kinda sad watching her suffer. She lasted about 4 days like this and then passed away. Now, our rooster is showing similar symptoms - started yesterday.


    I know most of you eat chickens but they’re our pets and bums us out to see them get sick - sounds corny, I know.


    Do any of you have recommendations? Ideas on what this could be? Any experiences (and not too costly) vets that you recommend that can help? Ideas on cures?


    We’ve treating the flock with Corid for coccidiosis. Hope it helps.


    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Hi, welcome to BYC! :frow

    Lots of people here don't eat their birds. But even those of us who do, don't enjoy when any of our animals get sick and ESPECIALLY not to see them suffer. :( It isn't corny AT ALL! :hugs

    Hey, congrats on getting outta the city! :wee

    Now lets get down to some clues...

    Lets chat first about 6 weeks ago... How old was this young chicken you lost? How old is your rooster? Where did you get these birds? How old is your 2 grown chickens and your 2 young ones? What do you feed including treats and supplements? How long have you had them ALL? How much space are they in? What are you using for bedding?

    My first suggestion is going to be take a fecal float to ANY vet. It cost $18-25 here and they can check for any worms AND your cocci load. Take several samples from different fresh droppings and combine into one to get a good look at your over all flock. This IS an accepted method. I know we have gotten a fair amount of rain in my part of Ca this past week... and that can contribute to cocci load. But how has your weather been?

    How long have you been treating with the Corid? Do you know if you have the dosage correct? Have you eliminated all other drinking sources and being sure not to supplement vitamins during this time?

    Minus the mucous.. a lot of those could be symptoms of cocci or worms. But there may be other symptoms that are being missed. You might check out this link and get familiar with some other symptom possibilities. It gives you the possible causes of the symptoms you describe and you might be able to narrow it down from there...
    http://www.poultrydvm.com/symptoms

    Are you able to post a pic of the bird? What color is the diarrhea?

    Worse comes to worse... especially since you had another recent death with what you describe as similar symptoms, I HIGHLY suggest you (refrigerate the body) pursue necropsy to see what is affecting your birds. It may be the only way to know the truth and it cost about $20 at UC Davis. Information to help achieve that follows in both links..

    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/how-to-send-a-bird-for-a-necropsy-pictures.799747/

    I hope you boy pulls through and that you get this figured out quickly. Sorry for your recent loss, also.

    :fl
     
    Eggcessive likes this.
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Is the mucus from the nostrils or is it coming out of the mouth? Mucus from the nostrils would point to a respiratory infection, while liquid coming out of the mouth could be from a crop problem, such as impacted or sour crop. Feel crops to see if there is food in them, and again in early morning to see if they have emptied over night, or if any are full and firm, doughy, or puffy.
     
    EggSighted4Life likes this.

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