1. lukebuesch21

    lukebuesch21 Hatching

    2
    11
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    Nov 4, 2018
    i have a newly acquired hen from a farm. I was told it was not uncommon for respiratory problems to arise after bringing them home to a new environment. Yesterday I was recommended to give her a half of an aspirin. I did this at approx 9:30pm. Overall she looks better today. I also treated her with vetrx and I mixed half of a ammoxicillin pill in 5 gallons of water and have been getting her to drink some of that as well. When can I give her another dose of aspirin? Or would anyone recommend against this?
     
    FlappyFeathers likes this.
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Welcome to BYC. It is always a toss up whether you will end up with a sick chicken when you bring them home. Respiratory diseases can be chronic and infect other chickens, and sick birds usually become carriers. Frequently, the stress of rehoming them can bring symptoms out. But respiratory diseases are not normal. I would be very cautious in keeping this bird, if you see watery or bubbly eyes, nasal drainage, sneezing, or rattly breathing. MG or mycoplasma, infectious bronchitis, coryza, and aspergillosis are some of the common diseases that you can read about in this link:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Most new birds should be quarantined for at least 30 days from other birds, to look for signs of diseases. Amoxicillin will not treat a respiratory disease, such as MG. Tylan 50, Denagard, and Oxytetracycline are drugs that can treat MG, but it is a chronic disease that can come back again later, and make them carriers for life.
     
    Wyorp Rock and FlappyFeathers like this.
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Welcome To BYC
    You've received good information from Eggcessive.

    Is there any way you can take the hen back?
    If she has respiratory symptoms, I too would consider not keeping her since you risk spreading an illness to your existing flock.
     

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